Espresso grind for Aeropress?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
dallasstar

#1: Post by dallasstar »

Has anyone tried brewing Aeropress using the same beans and same grind setting as you do for espresso? Love my espresso, but debating what is the ideal method to also get drip-like coffee on days when I'm in the mood for that (option 1: get separate grinder, option 2: get Aeropress to use with existing espresso grinder using my existing espresso settings). I don't yet own an Aeropress, hence the question. Also, adjusting my espresso grinder to drip settings is out of the question; I don't want to lose my settings. I'd be open to buying an aftermarket filter to make espresso grinds work well with Aeropress, if that's possible.

thirdcrackfourthwave

#2: Post by thirdcrackfourthwave »

You could try it. I don't think it will work. An Aeropress probably won't be able to generate the kind of pressure needed to force water through grinds that small.

Technivormer

#3: Post by Technivormer »

What about a cheaper hand grinder dedicated for different brews? Or even just make Americanos.

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baldheadracing
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#4: Post by baldheadracing »

dallasstar wrote:Has anyone tried brewing Aeropress using the same beans and same grind setting as you do for espresso? Love my espresso, but debating what is the ideal method to also get drip-like coffee on days when I'm in the mood for that (option 1: get separate grinder, option 2: get Aeropress to use with existing espresso grinder using my existing espresso settings). I don't yet own an Aeropress, hence the question. Also, adjusting my espresso grinder to drip settings is out of the question; I don't want to lose my settings. I'd be open to buying an aftermarket filter to make espresso grinds work well with Aeropress, if that's possible.
You can use an Aeropress to get brew strength equivalent to espresso; just follow the directions supplied with the Aeropress.

The Aeroproess doesn't have a high pressure extraction so you can't really get a drinkable ristretto, but at, say, a 1:3 brew ratio, the Aeropress has fooled people before.
What I'm interested in is my worst espresso being fantastic - James Hoffmann

jpender

#5: Post by jpender »

The official Aeropress recipe is for a "fine grind". I haven't matched espresso machine with Aeropress in terms of the grind but I have brewed the finest grind I could manage in one of my hand grinders. It was a very, very fine grind. Coupled with the low temperature and short dwell time of the official Aeropress recipe and it produced drinkable coffee of reasonable quality.

If you use normal brew temperature water and/or a longer brew time it will probably end up overextracted. So go with cool (185°F) and a 10 second steep. Follow that with a steady, not-too-hard press.

Give it a shot.

dallasstar (original poster)

#6: Post by dallasstar (original poster) »

Thanks guys, I'll try out the Aeropress. I'll still get an extra hand grinder as well in case I want to do pour over again (gave my old Baratza Encore to my gf).

tennisman03110

#7: Post by tennisman03110 »

To answer the initial question, I've tried the same grind as my espresso with AeroPress. I let it steep 30 seconds, and pressed down. Honestly I had a hard time just getting the water through the puck. And it was terrible, bitter.

Yes, it's a good idea to get a dedicated cheap hand grinder. The Aeropress isn't fussy, with grind size of brew method. It's my go-to at work or traveling. It's also my go-to method for older coffee, which might not be good as espresso or pour over.

lessthanjoey
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#8: Post by lessthanjoey »

Why not just adjust grind? Write down your setting and go back to it, flush half a shot of coffee through to purge.

jpender

#9: Post by jpender »

tennisman03110 wrote:To answer the initial question, I've tried the same grind as my espresso with AeroPress. I let it steep 30 seconds, and pressed down. Honestly I had a hard time just getting the water through the puck. And it was terrible, bitter.

It's bitter, overextracted, if you brew at a normal brew temperature. Try cooler water, like 80°C/175°F, steep just 10 seconds, and then press slowly, gently, just like in the instructions.

It's interesting that by doing this you'll get a high extraction, high enough to be considered overextracted (e.g. 23-25%), but it won't taste that way. It's really striking and a good demonstration of the effect brew temperature has on the character of the extraction.

It's not my preference for the Aeropress. I like hotter water better. Plus it takes a lot more effort to grind that fine. Besides, even with a crappy grinder (I have a Porlex for travel) it still works quite well.