Dialing In Coffee For V60 Pour-Over; What's Your Process?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
tylerlevick

#1: Post by tylerlevick »

Hello, fellow coffee nerds. My general daily routine is to prepare 2 coffees in the morning by V60 Pour-over, using a plastic V60 01, Fellow Stagg EKG Kettle, and Third Wave Classic Profile mineral supplements. I will drink different varieties of coffee almost every morning and never stick to just one. Grinder I'm using is a Titus Nautilus (Love It).


Questions for your dial-in process:

1. When you get your bag of coffee, how do you like to determine roast level (What it says on the bag, visual estimate, does it matter?)?

2. Grind size (A general baseline based on roast level?)

3. Temperature: How do you determine the temp of water to use? I understand the 195-205 recommendation (and I think that's of the actual slurry). But do you change temp based on your roast level of coffee?

4. Dose? Right now, I still like to do things based on an 8 oz cup of coffee (227 grams H20), and with a 1:16 ratio, it comes out to about a 13.6 gram dose of coffee. Do you have a minimum dose to use in your V60 01?


One big thing for me is this: If you taste astringency, do you change grind size or temperature, or both? I know the dial-in is contingent primarily based on grind size, but to what extent do you manipulate temperature to achieve your desired goal?


My favorite coffee is one that achieves both as much sweetness as possible while still maintaining a good differentiation of flavor in the cup.


Thanks!

T

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mkane
Supporter ♡

#2: Post by mkane »

First grind size.

Temp come next. As low as 195°

Rickpatbrown

#3: Post by Rickpatbrown »

Yes, grind size is the biggest thing to get right. I aim for a 3:30 minute brew (including 45 sec bloom). Then I adjust temperature. I'm mostly just using light roasted coffee, so I tend to use boiling water.

Temperature all depends on your water. Higher TDS water will benefit from cooler temps.

It's the same as espresso, though. If things are to sour, use a finer grind or hotter water. If they are too papery, use a couraer grind and cooler water.

If no matter what you do, the coffee sucks... you have sucky coffee beans. Get differnet coffee.

DamianWarS

#4: Post by DamianWarS »

tylerlevick wrote:Hello, fellow coffee nerds. My general daily routine is to prepare 2 coffees in the morning by V60 Pour-over, using a plastic V60 01, Fellow Stagg EKG Kettle, and Third Wave Classic Profile mineral supplements. I will drink different varieties of coffee almost every morning and never stick to just one. Grinder I'm using is a Titus Nautilus (Love It).


Questions for your dial-in process:

1. When you get your bag of coffee, how do you like to determine roast level (What it says on the bag, visual estimate, does it matter?)?

2. Grind size (A general baseline based on roast level?)

3. Temperature: How do you determine the temp of water to use? I understand the 195-205 recommendation (and I think that's of the actual slurry). But do you change temp based on your roast level of coffee?

4. Dose? Right now, I still like to do things based on an 8 oz cup of coffee (227 grams H20), and with a 1:16 ratio, it comes out to about a 13.6 gram dose of coffee. Do you have a minimum dose to use in your V60 01?


One big thing for me is this: If you taste astringency, do you change grind size or temperature, or both? I know the dial-in is contingent primarily based on grind size, but to what extent do you manipulate temperature to achieve your desired goal?


My favorite coffee is one that achieves both as much sweetness as possible while still maintaining a good differentiation of flavor in the cup.


Thanks!

T
generally speaking, I use the same recipe each time. 20gr dose, 300ml brew water. the grind size is typically the finer end of filter with just enough grit you can feel in between your fingers. I will adjust the water based on a visual judgment of the roast level with lower temps for dark roast and off the boil for light roasts. after that I dial in by taste. if it's sour/bitter/weak I adjust the grind/dose/temp etc... pour-overs are more forgiving than something like espresso so I typically find not a lot of adjustments, if any at all, are needed to make an enjoyable cup.

Jeff001

#5: Post by Jeff001 »

Rickpatbrown wrote:Yes, grind size is the biggest thing to get right. I aim for a 3:30 minute brew (including 45 sec bloom). Then I adjust temperature. I'm mostly just using light roasted coffee, so I tend to use boiling water.

Temperature all depends on your water. Higher TDS water will benefit from cooler temps.

It's the same as espresso, though. If things are to sour, use a finer grind or hotter water. If they are too papery, use a couraer grind and cooler water.

If no matter what you do, the coffee sucks... you have sucky coffee beans. Get differnet coffee.
Do you shoot for different times if you brew more coffee? For instance, 3:30 for 250ml, 4 for 500ml? I usually make 500ml, seems like most people brew less so I'm never sure how the times stack up

Rickpatbrown

#6: Post by Rickpatbrown »

Jeff001 wrote:Do you shoot for different times if you brew more coffee?
I always brew the same amount, 415g out from a 26g dose. I'm not sure of the V60 number.

If I brew for guests, I use a bigger Chemex for about 725g of coffee. The Chemex is slower, but it really is a different brewing technique.

I think that the times should all be similar; that each V60 size is optimal for a specific dose.

I don't really know the answer to your question, TBH. I would minimize my variables if I were you, and stick to a single dose.

I think the biggest challenge in pour over is the actually pour. How the water disrupts the coffee bed seems to make a big difference.