Cold Yemeni-blend lattes

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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TomC
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Postby TomC » Oct 12, 2017, 11:56 am

I found a little slice of heaven last night in a small latte that I didn't toss out but let cool to room temperature. My regular pattern with milk drinks goes something like this: pull shot into capp sized cup, sip 10ml of straight shot to assess/enjoy, stretch some 1/2 &1/2 for a small-medium sized latte of which I generally only drink a few sips of unless it's absolutely exceptional and unique, and usually toss out the remainder or offer it as a follow-up to my milk loving girlfriend after her first latte.

With that said, I had plans in the works to try something different yesterday on my first day off. I wanted to blend some of these very intensely flavored Yemeni (Port of Mokha) samples I have on hand with a simpler, sweet and mild, clean (washed) Costa Rican. I did a ratio of 30% Yemeni,70% Costa Rican. With a coarser grind, the shot resonated with sweetness, intensity, complex dark chocolates and brooding deeper notes common in good Yemeni coffees. But what really surprised me was sampling the drink as it cooled to room temperature. Everyone's noticed capps/lattes changing flavor as they cool down, but the flavor shift on this was profound. I haven't been this impressed with a milk drink in a long time. The sweetness goes thru the roof, but the characteristics of the exotic chocolates, leather, cedar, etc of the Yemeni component only amplify and get better as it cools.

I'll be firing up the gear here momentarily for a repeat performance. This time I might deliberately put the whole concoction right into the fridge to enjoy about 30 minutes later. I'd recommend anyone give this a try with any espresso blend that has a natural processed East African/Yemen component or maybe even an Indonesian.

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Boldjava
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Postby Boldjava » Oct 12, 2017, 12:56 pm

Tom, just send that Yemeni to me for straight shots or vacpots. <wide grin>. Thanks.

Dave
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TomC
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Postby TomC » Oct 12, 2017, 1:28 pm

I know, it's a bit sacrilegious. But fun.

I still have plenty of the first run of Red Marqaha sequestered away in the chest freezer. I bet that fruity Hawaiian Punch sweetness would do interesting things in a similar preparation.

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Boldjava
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Postby Boldjava » Oct 12, 2017, 2:06 pm

I know your dillemma. I ususally have 4 coffees on the counter. When I have a Yemeni, I am always tempted to play with a blend. I end up "playing that tune" in my mind instead on how they might taste and only blend when I am down to nubs at the end of the bag. Stuff is like honest to goodness saffron and vanilla that you end up not using it!

Still cruising the strip for green 2016/17 crop...will be slim and pricey.
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TomC
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Postby TomC » Oct 16, 2017, 11:19 pm

Still playing with these blends. It seems that the uniqueness is entirely dependent on using the Yemeni component. Natural Ethiopian's generally lack the intensity and complexity of some of Yemen's more rustic leathery notes. Those seem to be what elevates the drink when served at room temp. I tried it today over ice and it was just as good. I'll have to keep some rested Yemeni coffee tucked away in the chest freezer just for this purpose. These drink like the pre-made bottled lattes only these taste good, and without any sugar.

 
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