Calling all Siphon Users! - Page 5

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
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Boldjava

Postby Boldjava » May 12, 2018, 9:17 am

assemble everything with coffee in and turn on the heat.

No.

Water will begin to rise at 145* (on my Yamas) and you don't want it extracting at that temp. Let water rise, check for temp. 195-205* is best. Add coffee. Use a rice paddle ($2 anywhere) and push (don't stir) the coffee down the side while holding the edge of the top. It is almost like "folding" the coffee in. The idea is not to disturb that Cory/Corning rod or you will get a stall.

The Encore is not at fault for the fines. It is inherent in a vacpot with a rod.

Those are the steps I have found for best cups. YMMV.
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LMWDP #339

mgwolf

Postby mgwolf » May 12, 2018, 1:10 pm

One word of caution with vacpots. Be careful you do not grind the coffee too fine. If you do, you will have a 100% vacuum and no down flow of water, resulting in an implosion of the lower pot. Don't ask me how I know.

happycat

Postby happycat » replying to mgwolf » May 12, 2018, 8:33 pm

I've always kept this in mind but no probs in the last 5 years. Rod is performing well.

keepitsimple

Postby keepitsimple » May 13, 2018, 2:51 am

mgwolf wrote:One word of caution with vacpots. Be careful you do not grind the coffee too fine. If you do, you will have a 100% vacuum and no down flow of water, resulting in an implosion of the lower pot. Don't ask me how I know.


Never had a complete stall, but generally the advice is to turn the heat back on.

Tonefish

Postby Tonefish » May 15, 2018, 8:55 pm

Boldjava wrote:Water will begin to rise at 145* (on my Yamas) and you don't want it extracting at that temp. Let water rise, check for temp. 195-205* is best.

Dave, you got me thinking on this one. If the water starts rising at 145F and can only be 212F max in the lower chamber, how can you get the temperature to 185F-205F? I'm assuming the mixing of the water is occurring with linearly increasing water temperature as hotter water goes into the upper chamber? It doesn't keep heating once up in the upper chamber does it, or maybe it does from steam?

EDIT: Never mind Dave! Now I remember. You heat the water to the desired temperature and then insert the coffee filled upper chamber.
LMWDP #581 .......... May your roasts, grinds, and pulls be the best!

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Boldjava

Postby Boldjava » May 16, 2018, 6:01 am

Correct. I insert the upper chamber when the water is around 205. There is some cooling due to the room-temp glass being positioned.
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LMWDP #339

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IMAWriter

Postby IMAWriter » May 16, 2018, 12:00 pm

Boldjava wrote:No.

Water will begin to rise at 145* (on my Yamas) and you don't want it extracting at that temp. Let water rise, check for temp. 195-205* is best. Add coffee. Use a rice paddle ($2 anywhere) and push (don't stir) the coffee down the side while holding the edge of the top. It is almost like "folding" the coffee in. The idea is not to disturb that Cory/Corning rod or you will get a stall.

The Encore is not at fault for the fines. It is inherent in a vacpot with a rod.

Those are the steps I have found for best cups. YMMV.

+1
Rob
LMWDP #187
www.robertjason.com

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IMAWriter

Postby IMAWriter » May 16, 2018, 12:08 pm

I do it just a sight bit differently...I heat the water in the lower, till I see a bubble or 3, then insert the empty upper globe...the water rises, but no coffee in until the water is 80% up, and hass properly heated the upper globe. Then I add the coffee. Within 10 seconds I have the explosion, and use a wooden utensil, as does Dave to gentle push the grounds down from the sides, at the same time lowering the temperature just hot enough to keep things NORTH.
When the time up North has elapsed, I simply place the pot on a cool surface, usually right on top of the cook top's draft. The journey down takes 30 seconds or so for all my vac pots, the Yama being foolproof with my Cory and Silex glass rods.
Rob
LMWDP #187
www.robertjason.com

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yakster

Postby yakster » May 16, 2018, 4:01 pm

When I brew with my siphon, it's generally the least rigourous method of brewing I employ, all while fixing breakfast on the same cooktop that I'm brewing on. I measure out the coffee with the Yama scoop and don't use a scale. I loosly employ the traditional Chinese method of gauging the temperature of the water before afixing the funnel to the base. (which I did calibrate with a thermocouple years ago) I let the water rise and then dump in the ground coffee and press it down with the included paddle, but I do use a timer to let me know when two minutes have elapsed which is when I slide the stovetop Yama off the active burner and onto a cooler part of my glass cooktop.

https://www.mightyleaf.com/blog/brewing ... r-tea.html

Traditional Chinese Method:

The Chinese traditionally distinguish five stages of how water can come to boil for tea. James Norwood Pratt in his 'The New Tea Lover's Treasury" says: "The Chinese distinguish five stages of tea water as the boiling point is approached: "shrimp eyes," the first tiny bubbles that start to appear on the surface of the kettle water, "crab eyes," the secondary, larger bubbles, then "fish eyes," followed by "rope of pearls," and finally "raging torrent." If you have a glass tea kettle you can watch the bubbles through the glass and if a standard kettle, take a peek by opening the lid. The kind of bubbles correspond with the following types of teas and their appropriate brewing temperature:

Shrimp Eyes: Tiny bubbles the size of a pin head that resemble shrimp eyes begin to rise to the surface and pop. A slow and gentle vapor of steam will show. At 155°-174°F this temperature is ideal for delicate green teas.

Crab Eyes: Water that gets hotter will then produce larger growing bubbles about the size of crab eyes. Vertical streams of steam rise up during this stage. At around 175°F this temperature is perfect for brewing white, delicate green and greener oolong teas.

Fish Eyes: Bubbles resembling fish eyes (about the size of an average pearl) rise to the top of the kettle as the water heats up. More steam is present moving in thick columns than in the Crab Eyes stage and the kettle will make louder noises. At 175°-180°F this temperature is ideal for green tea or white teas. However, remember that if your green tea tastes bitter, the water is too hot.

Rope of Pearls: At 195°-205°F, a steady stream of large pearl size bubbles stream to the water's surface. This temperature is ideal for black, some oolong and pu-erh teas.

Raging Torrent: Water that sounds like a raging torrent with swirling and rolling bubbles is called "ruined water€"™. At 212°F this is considered to be de-oxgyenated and flat or what is traditionally called 'old man water'. Please note though that 212°F or a full boil is recommended for herbal tisanes to bring out the herb's full flavor. Exceptions to do exist though.

Remember, regardless of what method you choose, the key is that you enjoy the process and the flavor of your tea. Let us know what your preferred method is or what your daily boiling ritual looks like? Happy boiling!
-Chris

LMWDP # 272