Bonavita PID Kettle - 1st Look - Page 6

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
rlevine

#51: Post by rlevine »

I've never used the Barismo restrictor. I didn't realize it was this design.

But yes, I've used the Kalita kettle and it's probably the best I've gotten my hands on. So pricey though. Hard to bring myself to drop another $100 on a kettle.

Sam21

#52: Post by Sam21 » replying to rlevine »

The Barismo restricter was something that I would pop in and out of my Buono depending on what I was brewing. That led me to splurging on the Kalita kettle, which led me to buying a second one for my office. I love them so damn much not just for what they do, but how they look. They are great for tea, coffee, watering the plants (got to convince the wife somehow of their purpose), and their flow control puts me at ease with the fact that they aren't electric. That said, I find myself more and more leaning towards a siphon in the morning, so the Kalita kettle has been playing the eye candy game more and more.

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EricBNC (original poster)

#53: Post by EricBNC (original poster) »

rlevine wrote:I've never used the Barismo restrictor. I didn't realize it was this design.

But yes, I've used the Kalita kettle and it's probably the best I've gotten my hands on. So pricey though. Hard to bring myself to drop another $100 on a kettle.
I have a $30 kettle I can stare at all day long, and like the Kalita the water refuses to heat by itself.

The extra $60 ($89 is a common price) for the PID Bonavita kettle pays for precise temperature control and the ability to provide the heat without an external heat source. The count up timer feature is a nice add on too.
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skittles_s

#54: Post by skittles_s »

Owners: how are these holding up for you? Amazon has a number of reviews mentioning rust after only a few months. What are you finding? The price is "right" but is it adequately durable?

Thanks in advance for your input.

RobertL

#55: Post by RobertL »

I've had mine for several months and I've seen no signs of rust.

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Bob_McBob

#56: Post by Bob_McBob »

I've had mine since the beginning of October, and there are no signs of rust. There are similar reports about rust for the other Bonavita kettles (see attached photo), as well as the Hario Buono, but most customers seem to be happy.

The odor issue I mentioned earlier in the thread hasn't gone away. If I leave the kettle until it dries out completely, there is a plastic smell that must be coming from the gasket around the thermoprobe. I've also noticed that water left in the kettle for long periods of time (multiple weeks) takes on the same odor and has a foul taste. With regular daily use and the accompanying changes of fresh water, it isn't possible to detect anything.

Chris

Sam21

#57: Post by Sam21 »

Regarding those brown spots, any kettle I have ever owned gets them. Are we sure they are rust? In able to wipe them away to an extent on my electric Aroma kettle that I use to hear water for my Kalita kettle.

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Eastsideloco

#58: Post by Eastsideloco »

Really? I've had a Hario Buono kettle for a couple years and have never had a spot of rust, scale or anything else of the sort. That being said, I only use goose-neck kettle for pouring. Using it on a stove would probably be a different deal, especially if one were to inadvertently overheat the kettle. (If you must put your nice kettle on the stove, don't bruise the water; since the ideal extraction temperature is range is 195°F to 205°F, there's really no need to ever take water to a full boil [unless you live at elevation].) I do notice some minor scale buildup inside the electric kettle I use for heating the water-nothing a quick citric acid rinse wouldn't fix-but not any rust or anything that looks like rust.

Intrepid510

#59: Post by Intrepid510 »

I have a regular electric Bonavita and other than a little scale at the bottom; nothing like that. I have had my kettle for about a year and half, and basically abuse it. Never dry it out, leave water in it, BUT it does get used A LOT probably heats water 6 to 8 times per day. So perhaps the constant usage keeps it from getting that way.

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Boldjava
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#60: Post by Boldjava »

Eastsideloco wrote:... (If you must put your nice kettle on the stove, don't bruise the water; since the ideal extraction temperature is range is 195°F to 205°F, there's really no need to ever take water to a full boil [unless you live at elevation].) . . .
If you are doing pour-overs, the slurry of coffee decreases temps due to the coffee grounds being at room temp. I have used a thermometer to measure. I take my water up to edge of boiling (210*) and commence pouring. Lower temp water will leave you in the 180s/lower 190s for extracting -- not what you want.
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