Anyone want to try an experiment on big flat-bottom pour-over?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Acavia

#1: Post by Acavia »

I am very tempted to get one of these to try, but shy to try because it would take me away from my normal V60 pour-overs while I experimented.

https://bigjoecoffee.com/

It is a large, flat bottom, pour-over dripper, advertised to make up to 18 cups of coffee. The same company sells filters, but it looks like you could use the Melitta or Bunn 10-12 cup batch brewer filters, which are very inexpensive, for example, I saw 1000 of the Bunn filters for under $15US.

A more normal sized brew, for example 25g of coffee, might be too thin to extract well, or it might make for an easy way to get high extraction because you could probably grind very thin without the dripper jamming up the flow. If it flowed too fast with a normal sized pour-over brew size, you could use an Areopress filter over the exit hole, then put the big batch brewer filter over that, for a slower flow, and Chemex-like filtering. I just have a funny idea, in back of my head, that this might actually make very good coffee. Plastic, so it would hold heat well and big so as to allow very fine grinding without risk of blocking flow, etc.

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happycat

#2: Post by happycat »

Acavia wrote:I am very tempted to get one of these to try, but shy to try because it would take me away from my normal V60 pour-overs while I experimented.

https://bigjoecoffee.com/
On a website dedicated to $20,000 machines that make a single serving of 30ml of fresh coffee on demand...

... we have here a plastic "pour over" cone advertised for making 2.2 litre portions... larger than commercial batch brewers.

I guess you pair it with a big kettle and build up some muscle pouring the 2.2kg of water over it slowly.

The marketing rationales in their ad copy are really.... stretching it. "Saves your hands" because it's dishwasher safe. What about the hand cramps from the pouring sessions?

It does fit my stereotype of America though.

Next month.... the Big Joe Pro... a plastic bucket lined with cheesecloth and a hole in the bottom (otherwise known as the toddy)

Reminds me of a cheaper alternative

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/bunn-2 ... 30003.html
LMWDP #603

DamianWarS
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#3: Post by DamianWarS »

Acavia wrote:I am very tempted to get one of these to try, but shy to try because it would take me away from my normal V60 pour-overs while I experimented.

https://bigjoecoffee.com/

It is a large, flat bottom, pour-over dripper, advertised to make up to 18 cups of coffee. The same company sells filters, but it looks like you could use the Melitta or Bunn 10-12 cup batch brewer filters, which are very inexpensive, for example, I saw 1000 of the Bunn filters for under $15US.

A more normal sized brew, for example 25g of coffee, might be too thin to extract well, or it might make for an easy way to get high extraction because you could probably grind very thin without the dripper jamming up the flow. If it flowed too fast with a normal sized pour-over brew size, you could use an Areopress filter over the exit hole, then put the big batch brewer filter over that, for a slower flow, and Chemex-like filtering. I just have a funny idea, in back of my head, that this might actually make very good coffee. Plastic, so it would hold heat well and big so as to allow very fine grinding without risk of blocking flow, etc.
it should make coffee similar to larger batch brews if you get the right steps down. but it doesn't make 18 cups of coffee unless you call a single cup 4oz. more realistically it's like 8-10 cups. you would have to get a fast-flowing kettle like a Hario and something like a Fellow Stagg would be out of the question because it pours too slow (or just use a regular kettle). you would also have to have multiple refills or use more than 1 kettle so it doesn't disrupt the workflow. if you need that much coffee I would just suggest getting a larger batch brewer. if cost is an issue get a used one.

jgood

#4: Post by jgood »

How 'bout an espresso machine with a 125mm basket -- 58mm is so wimpy -- makes 8 double shots at a time....

DamianWarS
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#5: Post by DamianWarS » replying to jgood »

the word "espresso" comes from the Italian word for "expressly" as in expressly served for the customer in single servings. unless someone wanted 8 double shots it wouldn't really qualify as being "expressly for you" anymore (and Italians would reject such a large serving). however, with that said Angelo Moriondo is credited with the invention of the first espresso machine back in 1884. his machine took 500gr of coffee at a time, more of a batch brewer, and certainly not served as a single serving.

jgood

#6: Post by jgood »

Thanks for the history lesson!