Always brew at 197F?

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Yum
Posts: 107
Joined: 5 years ago

#1: Post by Yum »

How is it that Practically all of my pourover coffee's, light, medium light, many different regions are all brewing great at 197° F for years ? Not needing to change temp very often! WHATS UP WITH THAT , Can that be ?
:shock:

Jonk
Posts: 2197
Joined: 4 years ago

#2: Post by Jonk »

That happens to be roughly my favourite brewing temperature. Not too low (which can cause bland brews or underextraction) and not too high (which can cause harsh flavors).

That said, I think temperature is perhaps an overrated parameter. There are other things that have a bigger impact than slight variation there and it's nice to at least keep some things constant.

If you do want to change temperature often*, here's a chart that tries to give you general pointers:


Notice how 196F shows up for every roast level/processing.

*just keep on mind that viscosity and hence brew time will be affected too!

Ivyb82
Posts: 47
Joined: 1 year ago

#3: Post by Ivyb82 »

Because your coffee will always taste better as it reaches a lower temperature. Your cups will reach an optimal temperature much faster. I get a much extraction though at 210. Of course, I'm mostly brewing coffees from SEY, which are actual light roasts.

helicon47
Posts: 49
Joined: 5 months ago

#4: Post by helicon47 »

I notice a pronounced difference in extraction moving from 208 to 210 when brewing light roasts using the Pulsar. Much better extraction and greater sweetness and clarity/separation of flavors. Other brewers seem less sensitive to water temperature changes.

Jonk
Posts: 2197
Joined: 4 years ago

#5: Post by Jonk »

With a pulsar the temperature is supposed to drop more before hittings the coffee bed than what a bare kettle stream would, so it's not really apples to apples.

There are other ways to bump extraction. I'd perhaps be less enthusiastic about using 196F if all I did was a fast single pour in a high bypass dripper :D

helicon47
Posts: 49
Joined: 5 months ago

#6: Post by helicon47 »

Presumably you're measuring the temperature of the water, not the temperature of the slurry, though. I've measured the temperature of the slurry in the Pulsar and it stays impressively warm during the drawdown, though obviously not 210°F. It's definitely possible to stay in the range of 203-206°F with hot enough brew water. If I preferred medium roasts or more natural coffees I'd definitely drop the brew temp significantly, however.

viteaux
Posts: 40
Joined: 9 months ago

#7: Post by viteaux »

Jonk wrote:*just keep on mind that viscosity and hence brew time will be affected too!
I've noticed that hotter water draws down faster. Is there a "sciencey" reason for this? (I'm more of a Liberal Arts guy)

Jonk
Posts: 2197
Joined: 4 years ago

#8: Post by Jonk »

viteaux wrote:I've noticed that hotter water draws down faster. Is there a "sciencey" reason for this? (I'm more of a Liberal Arts guy)
Yes.


(see https://www.instagram.com/p/B0zpR4KB0RN/ or Gagnés book the full explanation)

espressoren
Posts: 468
Joined: 1 year ago

#9: Post by espressoren »

I've wondered how we are supposed to factor in altitude to these guidelines. Some of us can't hit much past 200°F.

Yum (original poster)
Posts: 107
Joined: 5 years ago

#10: Post by Yum (original poster) »

Lower Temperature? TRY IT, YOU'LL LIKE IT !..... :wink: