Elektra Microcasa a Leva Review

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drgary
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#1: Post by drgary »

The Elektra Microcasa a Leva is the most traditional of Elektra's home espresso machines. Its stunning design recalls a golden era when Italians invented the espresso we know today. If this is not already evident by its photo, when you see one of these up close its beautiful design and lustrous finish tell you you're dealing with something special. This is more than a home appliance, it's a work of art.


Photo of model ART.S1CO courtesy of 1st-Line Equipment

The Microcasa is not a new market entrant. It has been refined over many years by one of the leading manufacturers, Elektra s.r.l. of Treviso, Italy. Founded in 1947 by Umberto Fregnan and still owned by his family, Elektra introduced its first espresso machine in 1950. The company manufactures high-quality espresso machines, grinders and accessories for home and commercial use. Its products are sold and serviced through a worldwide dealer network.

If you are reading this, you may be considering purchase of the Elektra Microcasa a Leva for yourself or a loved one. You may have little or no experience buying an espresso machine. Or, you may be a hobbyist who has never owned a lever espresso machine and want to see what the fuss is about. I've written this review for each of you. Beginners are invited to read for an overview and feel free to skim the technical sections. Advanced users will skip the basics and will want to know specifications and user tips.

I write from the perspective of an amateur restorer of home lever espresso machines and as someone who appreciates the subtleties of fine coffees. This review would not be possible without the help of Jim Piccinich at 1st-Line Equipment, one of Home-Barista's long-time sponsors. Thank you, Jim, for providing one of these beautiful machines to run through its paces.

As I write this, the Microcasa a Leva comes in three models, chrome and brass (ART.SC1O), chrome (ART.S1C), and copper and brass (ART.S1). The first photo above is the model I tested.


Photos of model ART.S1C and ART.S1 courtesy of 1st-Line Equipment
Gary
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#2: Post by drgary (original poster) »

The all-chrome version does not require clearcoat to prevent tarnish, so it's easiest to maintain and the most scratch-resistant of the three models. In the chrome and brass version most of the parts exposed to wear are chrome except for the clearcoated brass drip grate. The chrome and brass and the chrome versions come with Bakelite handles for the lever and portafilter. The brass and copper model comes with wooden handles with a knobby shape that doesn't feel as comfortable as the Bakelite versions.

What's in the Box

The Elektra Microcasa a Leva is shipped mostly assembled. For compact and safe shipment, the following parts are stored in the styrofoam separately: top dome, dome handle (a brass eagle) with brass attachment bolt, lever and portafilter with handles, boiler cap, drip tray and grate, single and double filter baskets and a plastic measuring spoon and tamper. The steam wand is also removed in most cases. A user manual is also included. The Microcasa carries a two year parts and labor warranty that covers manufacturing defects.

A Classic Lever Espresso Machine

The Microcasa a Leva uses a spring-loaded piston to press water through coffee, just like the classic espresso machines of the 1950s. Those masterpieces of industrial design emulated the grillwork of luxury cars and the fanciful shapes, colors and lighting of jukeboxes. Extraction of espresso's delicate flavors was controlled through well-tuned machine age technology that was simple to maintain. First introduced in 1980s, the Microcasa is a thoroughbred inspired by the classic era. Unlike many of its competitors, its design and build quality have improved over the years.

The Microcasa is a straightforward machine whose form follows function. The brew group in front holds ground coffee, sealed inside a handle (portafilter) that locks in for pressurized brewing. Pulling the lever down cocks a spring while allowing water to flow into the coffee. Releasing the lever uses the power of the spring to push hot water through the coffee. This pressurized brew process creates a delicious, concentrated coffee drink with a buttery mouthfeel, topped with a layer of creamy foam. The sightglass on the left shows the water level in the boiler. The steam pressure gauge on top of the sightglass tells you whether the boiler has heated to operating temperature. A wand on the right is for steaming milk drinks.

Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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#3: Post by drgary (original poster) »

Basic Operation

The Microcasa a Leva is filled through a capped spout on top of the boiler, under the dome. Fill it with water to about half an inch from the top of the sightglass. Replace the boiler cap, make sure the steam knob is in the Off position, and activate the power switch that turns on a heating coil at the bottom of the boiler. The Microcasa's 850 watt heating element brings the boiler to brew temperature in about 12 minutes. To brew right away, purge some hot water through the grouphead and you're ready to go. Pull the lever down fully to infuse hot water into the coffee. Make sure you have the handle locked firmly in place, and when learning to use the machine keep a grip on the portafilter handle, turning it outward to prevent it from turning out. If you pull the lever without coffee in the handle or lock the handle into the group without coffee in it, maintain your grip on the lever with both hands. Otherwise it can spring back forcefully, risking injury. The Microcasa will fully warm up in less than 30 minutes without a heating flush. Before refilling make sure it's turned off and all pressure has released. If it's mostly empty, let it cool for at least five minutes before refilling so you don't stress a hot heating element with cold water.

Mechanical Features

Startup doesn't require purging air from the machine because a vacuum breaker releases that during warm-up. Thus it can be connected to an appliance timer (not supplied) and be ready when you wake up.


Vacuum breaker and adjustable pressurestat

Built for home use, the Microcasa operates on standard household current, 110 volts in the U.S. and Canadian version and 220 volts in the European version. There is no option to plumb in. An adjustable pressure switch (pressurestat) maintains boiler pressure within a 0.3 bar range. This is a sufficiently narrow range that coffee will taste good consistently because brew temperature is also controlled by the preheated brew group and portafilter.

Boiler pressure is pre-set at the factory at 0.9 bar and can probably be left unchanged unless you like to brew very dark or light roasted coffees. The temperature can be changed without adjusting the pressurestat to switch coffees during a brew session. For lighter roasts temperature of the brew group can be quickly raised with a heating flush that purges hot water run through the group. For darker roasts it can be quickly cooled by locking in a cool portafilter.

The Microcasa's spring starts with 8 bars of pressure that declines linearly, a pressure profile that brews espresso with many layers of flavor. Its 1.8 liter boiler is large for a home lever machine and delivers nine double shots in a single session, somewhat fewer when steaming for milk drinks.

Safety Features

The greatest enemy of any espresso machine is the build-up of minerals (scale) that can prevent the pressurestat from turning off. Scale can also coat the heating element so it overheats, which risks rupture. Maintenance requires monitoring the machine for mineral scale and using water that won't cause rapid scaling. Since the top inside of the group cylinder is dry, it should also be periodically checked to keep it lubricated and ensure mineral salts aren't accumulating, which can cause the brass to degrade (Prof. Robert Pavlis, noted many times in these forums).

A thermal safety switch on the bottom of the boiler helps protect against overheating. My review machine has a convenient button on the outside of the bottom plate for resetting that switch. Future versions may not have that button to comply with new European regulations, but a reset will still be possible after removing the bottom plate.


Thermal safety switch and reset button on underside of espresso machine's base

The boiler cap's spring-loaded overpressure valve (OPV) releases steam under excessive pressure to prevent explosively rupturing the boiler or pipe fittings. The other common hazard with any electric appliance is a short that can occur with component failure, loose connections or water leakage. The Microcasa a Leva's power cord terminates in a grounded plug to help mitigate shock risk. An appliance run with electricity and water is most safely run on an outlet that shuts power if it detects ground faults (a GFCI). Such outlets are commonly installed in kitchens and can be retrofitted with a portable GFCI (not included with the machine) attached to the power cord.
Gary
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#4: Post by drgary (original poster) »

How to Brew Consistently

Consistently brewing excellent espresso requires controlling several factors. To get the best out of a particular coffee, the temperature range must fall within its sweet spot. Flow rate must be controlled to avoid over or under-extraction. You need sufficient pressure to extract a rich, syrupy mouthfeel. The MCAL comes with oversimplified instructions and measuring spoons designed for preground, canned coffee. Keeping it that simple will create a mediocre brew and one that isn't consistent. It's worth learning some skills for a fine machine like this, and investing in an adjustable burr grinder of the same or better quality.

Even advanced users can become frustrated dialing in an espresso machine that operates differently from what they're used to. If you've honed your skills with a pump machine or one where you press buttons to adjust temperature, this machine is analog, not digital. The spring in the lever provides consistent brew pressure comparable to a pump machine, but it's refreshingly quiet. You control the preinfusion by holding down the lever to a count or watching for droplets to appear in the cup. Once you have the Microcasa within temperature range of your coffee, you'll learn to trust its consistency. Temperature control is learned through trial and error but is quickly mastered. You can do pressure profiling within the upper limit of the spring and lower brew pressure by retarding the lever. The lever cannot be assisted to add pressure. And if you "choke" the brewing process by grinding too finely or overdosing, you'll have to wait for the pressure to release, or try to speed the process by pressing on top of the piston rod. Once you get dose, grind and temperature within range -- and it isn't hard -- this is very consistent espresso machine and a joy to own.

This review assumes you have a high quality, adjustable burr grinder and are working with fresh coffee. These are crucial because the resistance of the coffee cake to water under pressure determines whether you'll extract the best flavors. To dial in your technique you can start with 16 gm of coffee in the double filter basket. The grind is fine enough if it only feels slightly gritty and coarse enough if it yields crema (foam). Tamping doesn't need to be hard; even distribution is more important. Your shot should run about 25 seconds, but the exact timing of the shot is less crucial in a lever machine because of its declining pressure profile that helps prevent overextraction. While dialing in keep the dose the same and adjust your grind until you hit the sweet spot. Experienced users know that grind and dose will vary to optimize the coffee and roast level. The double filter basket will easily accommodate 18 gm. Espresso 101: How to Adjust Dose and Grind Setting by Taste is an excellent guide. Brewing on a gentle spring lever like the Elektra Microcasa a Leva is more tolerant of such variations compared to a pump machine.

Since I've owned a Microcasa, I easily get repeatable, excellent shots with the grinder set so I can fill the filter basket above the rim, sweep it across the top to discard any excess, and tamp for headroom. If you want a larger shot you can load the double filter basket to the max, re-cock the lever part way through its travel and release it again (the so-called "Fellini Move"). More volume than that can thin the coffee and result in not much more taste even if brewing for milk drinks. To brew with the single basket, keep the grind about the same, and fill it with about 9 gm. Tamp for sufficient headspace to allow the portafilter to lock in.

Temperature Control for Different Coffees

For those used to dialing in temperature by the numbers, get ready for an analog experience, but one that isn't hard. Experienced users will know that coffee is best brewed within a temperature range rather than one exact temperature. This extracts a variety of flavors. The overall temperature is set with the pressurestat under the base, but let's assume you start with the factory setting of 0.9 bar that climbs to 1.2 before the heater shuts off. This is a sufficiently narrow deadband (adjustable temperature range) for consistent brewing.

In general temperature of the Microcasa can be adjusted to properly and consistently brew all roast levels. Its temperature can be tweaked during a brew session without adjusting the pressurestat with heating flushes or locking in a cool portafilter. This machine is very versatile for temperature control and the required techniques quickly become second nature.

If left on for an extended time, temperature at the outside of the group climbs and stabilizes about 16°F/9°C above the starting temperature after initial warm-up. Keep this in mind if you use the machine unmodified, and you may want to lock in a cool portafilter if it's been cruising for awhile. I applied a simple fix that I learned from several H-B members when tuning up my 1989 Microcasa. I fashioned a heat break gasket out of 0.03 inch Teflon (PTFE) sheet using scissors and a leather punch. For safety, be sure to install bolts that are longer by at least the extra thickness of the gasket. You'll want to have the bolt turn in by six full threads of engagement into the boiler, keeping in mind that any modifications to factory specification are taken at your risk.* The heat break gasket fastens between the group and the boiler to slow heat transfer and prevents this overheating so the machine becomes temperature stable over time. Based on this machine and owner experience I believe it permits optimal tuning compared to reducing boiler pressure. The gasket allows ample steam power and shot temperature without overheating. A heat break gasket is standard factory issue on more than one competitive espresso machine, where its thickness is taken into account when specifying bolt length.


Tracing from the boiler flange to create the heat break gasket

The factory setting is ideal for Full City or Full City + (FC+) roasts, where the beans are fairly dark but haven't released abundant oil to the surface. To accommodate lighter roasts without adjusting the pressurestat, do a heating flush for as much as five seconds. In my brief testing this raised external group temperature by 15°F/8°C. If you're brewing a darker roast, lock in a cool portafilter and wait for at least 30 seconds before pulling the shot. If it's still pulling too hot you can leave the cool portafilter in place longer or briefly toggle off power. Without toggling off I was able to cool external group temperature by 6°F/3°C when locking in a portafilter for two minutes. The portafilter had been cooled under tap water. I initially tested the machine with a FC+ roast and didn't need to make these adjustments. In the same brew session, a five second heating flush was sufficient for perfectly brewing a Nordic roast, which is light but fully developed. If you never drink coffees roasted to second crack -- if you don't know what that means leave the machine at the factory setting -- you may want to adjust the pressurestat so the heating element turns on at 1.1 bar, where the steam gauge needle is in the middle of the green band. I adjusted the pressurestat to that level to pull some perfect shots of light, Nordic roasted coffee without a heating flush. The only inconvenience in adjusting the pressurestat is that it's intentionally positioned so only a very short screwdriver will lock into the adjustment screw. The bottom plate easily comes off by removing the screw that attaches it to the base from under the drip tray. If you have any difficulty removing the plastic bottom plate, the only other thing holding it in place is a press fit. A dull tool like the edge of a credit card can help pry it off without damaging the finish.

Temperature Control Under Load

To see how this machine performed at its limits, I did some speed runs, pulling multiple shots in a row, with and without a heat break gasket installed. Without a heat break gasket pulling 8 shots within 15 minutes caused the external group temperature to rise 22°F/12°C. External group temperature rise not including the first shot was 18°F/10°C. I controlled overheating at the coffee cake by rinsing the portafilter in a pot of room temperature water. With this technique I was able to keep brew temperature stable. But if you want to walk up and pull shots after the Microcasa has been running for awhile without making compensating adjustments, a heat break gasket is recommended.

With a heat gasket installed, a speed run of 9 shots in 15 minutes raised external group temperature only 3°F/1.7°C. Temperature at the coffee cake was essentially consistent and actually declined slightly because I also cooled the portafilter between shots. Without a heat break gasket and at the factory setting of 0.9 bar, group temperature rose from 192°F/89°C at 30 minutes to 204°F/96°C over 107 minutes. Temperature rise was much steeper from initial warm-up. With the heat break gasket installed external group temperature stabilized at 185°F/85°C over 100 minutes.

These temperature studies were conducted using crude home equipment. Essentially I punched a hole in a double basket and inserted a temperature probe, positioning the tip at the top center of the coffee cake, where water first enters the brew chamber. Another probe was held against the lower flare of the group, near the back. Readings from these probes were routed to my aging Macbook computer and displayed on Artisan home roasting software. That setup could help dial in the machine with different roasts levels. With practice one can settle into a routine that accommodates different coffees without temperature measurements.


* This post is provided for informational purposes only. Espresso equipment contains controls and conduits for electricity, very hot water, steam and high water pressure. Attempting repairs, modifications, alterations, or diagnoses of such equipment yourself could result in serious injury or death to yourself and to others and the destruction of property by fire and other causes. I accept no responsibility for any injuries or losses resulting from any attempt to perform equipment repairs, modifications, alterations, or diagnoses based on information from Home-Barista.com.
Gary
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drgary (original poster)
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#5: Post by drgary (original poster) »

Feature Summary

I've owned the 1989 version of this machine. I've enjoyed testing this new model and seeing its design and build improvements. Here's my review summary. I expand on those items that aren't self-explanatory.

Pros
  • Soft, layered espresso shots
  • Excellent milk texturing
  • Stunning design, including 1st-Line's use of the European version eagle with upturned wings
  • Silent brewing compared to pump machines
  • Fast startup assisted by vacuum breaker
  • Stable base
  • Lever design prevents tipping
  • Temperature can be modulated to suit different coffees
  • Mostly high quality materials
  • On/Off steaming
  • Easily serviced
Cons
  • Small shots compared to commercial brew groups
  • Group can overheat over time
  • Lever cannot be assisted for more forceful pulls
  • Portafilter handle locks in toward steam wand, somewhat obstructing it
  • Non-chrome finishes aren't durable
  • Exposed boiler
  • Eagle ornament has sharp, pointed beak
Soft, layered shots. The Elektra Microcasa a Leva is especially known for mellow espresso that reveals many layers of flavor. It's finely tuned for this by design, and the main feature allowing this is its spring of moderate tension. This is an important point for your espresso preferences. With this machine it's possible to pull concentrated, syrupy shots. But that is not its specialty. Its much broader sweet spot is soft, layered espresso that is less intensely concentrated. The distinctive quality of its espresso has been noted by others over the years. I found it in my 1989 model and this current version. Here's Dave Stephens' eloquent description from the Lever Espresso Machine Smackdown thread of 2007.
cannonfodder wrote:The Elektra produces an amazingly clear and clean cup. The acidity is accentuated with the deep earthy tones being moved to the background. The fruity sweet flavors are accentuated but not overpowering. You would think a machine that accentuates these flavors would pull harsh and extreme cups when using bright blends or single origin coffees but it does not.
Excellent steaming. Steaming is easily controlled by a quarter turn of the steam knob. It's designed so steaming is instantly available while the machine is cruising at brew temperature. Steaming intensity depends on how you have the boiler pressure adjusted. Steaming is certainly sufficient for fine microfoam at factory settings. At the U.S. factory setting steaming is gentler than with a commercial machine, but this makes steaming more forgiving for home users. The steam tip has three holes that are effective for creating a spinning vortex of milk when it's immersed ½ inch from the edge of pitcher. That vortex moves the milk past the steam tip for even heating without burning it. The coffee should be thoroughly infused with water and the lever released before starting to steam, or you can slow pre-infusion.

Vacuum breakers typically seep a small amount of water while venting trapped air. This vacuum breaker is cleverly located so those few drops are contained by the rim where the dome inserts. That soon evaporates, so you'll want to occasionally wipe the area clean. If you watch the machine heating up, you'll see a few bubbles and hear a gentle hiss of steam releasing before pressure is built sufficiently to close the vacuum breaker.

Stable base. The Microcasa's large, round base provides lateral and forward stability to compare favorably to almost all other home lever machines. The boiler is well attached and the base metal is thick enough to prevent the flexing one can find when using the lever on other machines. The base now has small rubber feet to prevent sliding. When the lever is pulled, there is very slight "give" as the rubber absorbs the pressure. Prior versions had a lipped, rubber base or plate on the bottom that trapped water. Since the base is made of plain steel that's plated, the bottom edge could easily rust in that groove. That hazard has been greatly reduced by attaching the bottom plate with a screw and eliminating the groove that seated the edge of the base. During my testing water did not accumulate under the drip tray, but it's something worth checking after every brew session to make sure the base attachment screw is dry.

Easy servicing. The Elektra Microcasa a Leva is the easiest to service among all home lever machines now being made. Removing two screws that hold the lever assembly to the group enable lifting off that plate. Gently pumping the lever extrudes the entire lever and piston assembly. This speeds replacement of worn piston gaskets and general cleanup, including the shower screen. The entire group easily removes from the boiler with four hex-capped screws that have ample length for stable attachment, even with an added gasket. Lever machines generally cannot be backflushed. To keep the shower head clean I finish each brew session with a flush after brushing and wiping with a paper towel. When pulling the lever to flush water through the group, use both hands to prevent it forcefully snapping back. Using a wet towel to gently remove milk residue from the steam wand before the milk has hardened preserves the clearcoat and plating. The tip should be purged after steaming milk to keep it from clogging. Avoid injury by purging the steam wand into a bar towel or steam pitcher. When installing piston gaskets lubricate with food safe petrogel or Dow 111.

Chrome finish versus clearcoat. The chrome model resists tarnish, and the chrome and brass model has most parts exposed to wear finished in chrome with the exception of the brass drip grate. These two models are more durable than the copper and brass model. Although they're very attractive, copper and brass tarnish when exposed to air. The clearcoat eventually chips, scratches, or wears, exposing the underlying metal. And attempting to polish tarnished spots wears away clearcoat, resulting in more tarnish. Some people live with this "patina," which can make the machine appear antique, but I don't find it attractive. Although this may not be true in the current version, the plating is thin in pre-2005 models, so polishing can expose a different underlying metal. Removing the clearcoat would require finding the right solvent and may need disassembly before application. Spraying clearcoat with good coverage and without runs is tricky, so that job may be best done by an auto paint shop.

Safety lever design. Spring loaded levers on many machines press downward as the spring uncoils, but they cannot be pushed to increase pressure. This is a safety feature that helps prevent tipping. But there are trade-offs. It limits one's ability to quickly clear the group if one has packed the portafilter with coffee too finely ground, stalling (choking) the extraction. It also prevents applying higher brew pressure that can help bring out the best in very light roasted coffees. Users of small stature may have find it difficult to pull down the lever and should use both hands. Inexperienced users who pull down and release the lever without coffee in the handle -- or without water infusing the coffee -- can be hit with force when it snaps back.

Portafilter handle partially obstructs steam wand. Successive models continue to incorporate a portafilter (coffee holder) that turns in to the right, partially obstructing access to the steam wand. Approaching it from straight on, I need to lift the pitcher over the handle. Or I switch hands so I'm holding the pitcher in my right hand and using my left hand on the knob. Others may not experience this as an inconvenience, but on competitive machines including the Olympia Express Cremina and the La Pavoni manual levers the portafilter handle locks away from the steam wand. There are workarounds for the Microcasa, such as removing the portafilter before steaming milk, or approaching the machine partly from the side. When unlocking the portafilter carefully release pressure by raising the lever and loosen the portafilter slowly to avoid spraying hot coffee grounds in a portafilter "sneeze."

Hot, exposed boiler. Because of its exposed boiler, the Microcasa is not suitable for a household with young children or others who cannot easily be taught to avoid touching it. The steam wand also gets very hot. Some competitive machines enclose the boiler and some larger machines have no-burn steam wands. But there are trade-offs. The exposed boiler and thin steam wand look very elegant.

Very sharp beak on eagle ornament. This is a minor criticism, but a friend who just bought one of these plans to file the beak on the eagle version with raised wings because the tip of the beak is sharp enough it's uncomfortable to grasp that way. This was not the case with my 1989 machine where the eagle had downturned wings. But that version of the eagle is not nearly as attractive as the European one with raised wings that 1st-Line supplies in response to consumer demand.

Review Summary

I enthusiastically recommend the Elektra Microcasa a Leva for its excellent shot quality and steaming, its stunning good looks and ease of servicing. However some finishes easily tarnish. The chrome and brass version is very attractive and wears well, except for the clearcoated brass drip grate. With the brass and copper version expect eventual tarnishing that will be difficult to remedy. I don't like the ergonomics of the portafilter locking in toward the steam wand. The Microcasa is equipped with safety features to help avert shock and damage from overheating. But its exposed boiler and group and steam wand pose potential burn hazards.

I rate espresso performance relatively high because shots are mellow and layered, and quantity is good for a home machine. However without a double pull it delivers a somewhat smaller shot than you can get with a commercial group. The barista can modify the Microcasa's temperature during the same brew session for different coffee roast levels. The pressurestat is adjustable from under the base but access to the adjustment screw could be improved. Also the Microcasa's spring is only moderately strong and its lever cannot be pushed to deliver a thick and syrupy ristretto, so a strength here is also a limitation.

For a lever machine I find the Microcasa extremely easy to use and consistent if temperature is well controlled. But then I am very experienced with levers and am using it with grinders with 68mm conical burrs. New users or those who have only had pump machines will have to rely on dose and grind to control flow rate, and this may be challenging. I find the Microcasa relatively forgiving of barista technique because its declining pressure profile reduces channeling or overextraction. Also a springed lever is more consistent than a manual one. You may need to modify technique for temperature control because the stock version gets hotter over time, so that's an important consideration. A heat break gasket would eliminate that factor and the added temperature stability would increase my rating by one point. Pulling the lever can require significant effort for some people.

I rate cappuccino performance high because of the quality of steamed milk. I also like the quick On/Off action of the steam knob. With the machine at the factory pressure setting steaming is not as fast as it could be. When the pressure is raised for lighter roasts, steaming is more robust.
Gary
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What I WOULD do for a good cup of coffee!

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peacecup
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#6: Post by peacecup »

With the heat break gasket installed external group temperature stabilized at 185°F/135°C over 100 minutes.
185F = 85 C. That's why I was struggling to figure out why your coffee wasn't burnt! All of your Celsius conversions are way off.

It would be interesting to see the actual temperatures at the puck, instead of just the +/- values. I've always wondered what the brew temperatures were on these machines.

Nice review.
PC
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doubleOsoul
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#7: Post by doubleOsoul »

Excellent review, Gary. Nice to see an in-depth review of my favorite lever.

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#8: Post by [creative nickname] replying to doubleOsoul »

+1! Gary, this is a great review of one of my all-time favorite home levers.
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drgary (original poster)
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#9: Post by drgary (original poster) »

peacecup wrote:185F = 85 C. That's why I was struggling to figure out why your coffee wasn't burnt! All of your Celsius conversions are way off.

It would be interesting to see the actual temperatures at the puck, instead of just the +/- values. I've always wondered what the brew temperatures were on these machines.

Nice review.
PC
Thanks, Jack. I'll go in and correct those C numbers. (Done). I'll also review temperature readings I took at the coffee cake while measuring the outside of the group and will post some of that info when I have a chance.
Gary
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pizzaman383
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#10: Post by pizzaman383 »

I seem to remember that there was a rework/update to the group design head at some point. Is that true? If so, when was it done and what was changed?
Curtis
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