Why would you not buy a DE1?

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
DamianWarS
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#1: Post by DamianWarS »

I've recently made the payment for a DE1 and it will be shipped early next month. I have very specific reasons for choosing it that I can't see any reason why I would get another machine. I know why it would work for me but what are some reasons if you were shopping for a new machine why the DE1 is not your choice?

lessthanjoey
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#2: Post by lessthanjoey »

I have one and agree with you, I wouldn't trade it for anything else I know of, regardless of cost.

But I think the answer to your question is pretty well hashed out. People don't like the aesthetics, the idea of using a tablet, just want to make coffees that don't really benefit from decent's functionality (ie dark roast, for lattes). Recently, some ppl were upset on principle at regional price differences.

I love mine and cannot imagine giving up the functionality and feedback I have now but everyone has their own priorities and I get that!

Edit: by regardless of cost I don't mean that people should stretch themselves to buy this or not look to lower priced options. I mean that I wouldn't accept a higher priced option in trade for it. Ie., if someone wanted to give me a slayer, gs3, kvdw, etc and only trade the Decent in return I would rather keep my Decent (pedantics about reselling and buying another Decent aside).

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Nunas
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#3: Post by Nunas »

Andrew, I think it boils down to personal preference. While few would argue that the DE1 isn't a huge advancement in the technology of making espresso (ha, ha, did I really write that :lol: ), some of us prefer lower-tech. I recently bought a Quest M6 roaster, opting for it instead of the Aillio Bullet. The reason is that the Bullet contains proprietary hardware and software, while the M6 could be repaired by anyone with an ounce of DIY capability. Likewise, I bought an ECM Synchronika instead of a DE1, even though at the time, the DE1 seemed to be the darling of this forum. I also have a spring lever and a manual lever machine, for similar reasons. For me, the hands-on experience trumps technology; it's a Zen thing. :wink:

MichaelC

#4: Post by MichaelC »

Being newer to espresso, I like the simplicity of a machine with very few variables to manage.

I think the DE1 can be easily become overwhelming for newer users.

luvmy40

#5: Post by luvmy40 »

If I ever go the upgrade route, I will buy the DE1 + or what ever the equivilent is at that time. However, I am very happy with my BDB and have no need, at this time to upgrade.

So, a couple things that might make me reconsider going with Decent:

Price. I do realize the extreme value inherent in the DE 1 and do not think it over priced. It's just expensive.

Extras needed to plumb in supply and drain. I.e., more cost.

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HB
Admin

#6: Post by HB »

lessthanjoey wrote:I have one and agree with you, I wouldn't trade it for anything else I know of, regardless of cost.
At the risk of pointing out the obvious, if you search on title only "budget espresso machine", you'll noticed that the $2999 starting price point is already at the upper end of most buyer budgets. There's plenty of people who would go :shock: if you suggested spending $5000+ on an espresso machine + grinder + accessories solely to produce 2 ounces of liquid.
Nunas wrote:I also have a spring lever and a manual lever machine...
Indeed! I'll be a little contrarian and ask: Given sufficient skill, what can a DE do that you cannot replicate on your levers? There's no doubt that technology is a helpful exploration aid, but in the end, isn't espresso really boil down to hot pressurized water being pushed through coffee?
Dan Kehn

walr00s
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#7: Post by walr00s »

HB wrote:Indeed! I'll be a little contrarian and ask: Given sufficient skill, what can a DE do that you cannot replicate on your levers? There's no doubt that technology is a helpful exploration aid, but in the end, isn't espresso really boil down to hot pressurized water being pushed through coffee?
Maybe this isn't true, but my impression is that the DE1 can give you feedback more definitive than just a satisfying taste that everything went the way you wanted it to. Could be wrong, but it seems like other machines don't do that...but then again, what do you really care if you're happy with the cup?

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lessthanjoey
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#8: Post by lessthanjoey »

HB wrote:At the risk of pointing out the obvious, if you search on title only "budget espresso machine", you'll noticed that the $2999 starting price point is already at the upper end of most buyer budgets. There's plenty of people who would go :shock: if you suggested spending $5000+ on an espresso machine + grinder + accessories solely to produce 2 ounces of liquid.
I'll edit my initial response , I meant something different by "regardless of cost". Specifically, if someone wanted to trade me a slayer, gs3, kvdw, for no cost other than my decent, I would keep my Decent.

Auctor
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#9: Post by Auctor »

Before I jump in, I want to acknowledge that I have not used a Decent. I was in the market for an espresso machine, and Decent was in my consideration set. My opinions are therefore based on my own research and others' anecdotes. A few things come to mind:

1) Pressure-profiling - I do not believe that there's broad consensus across the Specialty coffee world that pressure-profiling capabilities offered by Decent are a definitive improvement over what's already in the market. (Certainly, there are some incredibly strong (and in some cases "famous") opinions on the subject.)

2) Light Roasts - While I think that light roasts are becoming more common in commercial settings, I'm not convinced that they're the norm, and light roasts are definitely not the norm in people's homes. Light roasts, longer pre-infusions, and pressure-profiling all seem to be linked, and unless there's a huge shift in roasters everywhere toward light roasts, pressure-profiling and longer pre-infusions capabilities seem to be a niche.

3) Steam Power - Decent is putting out videos showing how a barista could make [xx] number of lattes in a short period of time. To me, the videos are a form of marketing to assure future buyers about Decent's ability to churn drinks, and the messaging is needed to overcome what I believe is a known deficiency of Decent - steam power over multiple drinks.

4) Dependability and Repairs - My wife is astounded by the fact that I need to "grease parts", and that certain elements of my Synchronika will need to be replaced in 1-2 years. I tend to agree with her. I come from a world of consumer appliances where a product can last 5+ years without any repair. My Breville blender is a classic example of that - rock solid for over a decade. Decent (*maybe* moreso than other known brands) appears to require more "tinkering", or the possibility of it (since 5-10 year reliability isn't well known). I can imagine many consumers who would shudder to open up their machine, let alone replace parts inside.

5) Things that were already mentioned:
a. Overall Aesthetics
b. UI of the Tablet
c. Price
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DamianWarS (original poster)
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#10: Post by DamianWarS (original poster) »

Nunas wrote:Andrew, I think it boils down to personal preference. While few would argue that the DE1 isn't a huge advancement in the technology of making espresso (ha, ha, did I really write that :lol: ), some of us prefer lower-tech. I recently bought a Quest M6 roaster, opting for it instead of the Aillio Bullet. The reason is that the Bullet contains proprietary hardware and software, while the M6 could be repaired by anyone with an ounce of DIY capability. Likewise, I bought an ECM Synchronika instead of a DE1, even though at the time, the DE1 seemed to be the darling of this forum. I also have a spring lever and a manual lever machine, for similar reasons. For me, the hands-on experience trumps technology; it's a Zen thing. :wink:
that makes sense and I'm not trying to belittle anyone's choice or personal preference. While the DE is not ugly, espresso machines do have a long history of having a specific look and the DE might not fit that. Some machines demand to be looked at and dominate the room where DE seems it could blend in the background more. I am using it as a teaching aid and I require it to be compact, mobile, easy to set up and very versatile. since the newer versions has introduced actual buttons the unit can be programmed to perform a certain way and then the tablet taken away to not distract the forcing a more hands-on approach and troubleshooting based on traditional methods, not a graph on a screen. I can't say it's the perfect substitute for someone to learn from then jump into a cafe with a large 4 group machine, (things like workflow and multitasking and competition pre are good examples) but I think it sufficiently answers basic to advanced levels. The mobility of it was a big reason and the fact that it comes in a rolly suitcase certainly made it an easier choice. Maybe an odd feature to look to but for someone travelling lots with, it was a bonus feature.