What makes La Marzocco GS/3 different from Linea Mini or similar priced espresso machines? - Page 2

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
Beezer

#11: Post by Beezer »

Well, I hear some coffee roasters and shops are using Minis for catering or outdoor events. Everything I hear is that the Mini works nicely for light commercial use, though plumbing in and out would seem like a no brainer. But obviously a lot of shops already have a GS3, so they would probably continue to use what they have instead of getting a different machine.

Also, calling the Mini's small brew boiler a thermoblock is a bit of a misnomer. It is a true boiler, albeit quite small. Unlike a thermoblock, which flash boils a very small amount of water on demand, the Mini's boiler is highly temp stable and has been shown to compare favorably to other machines with bigger boilers like a GS3.

There might be some advantage to a GS3 under heavy commercial use, but I suspect that's only under really tough conditions. Dan could probably give you a better answer on that, since he's used both machines to serve fairly large crowds, but as I recall the Mini was more than up to the task.

Anyone who is planning on just using their machine for normal home espresso brewing and maybe the occasional party would be very happy with either machine.
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Beezer

#12: Post by Beezer »

dlodewyk wrote:
I am looking for a machine that I could use at events. This one might work?

It should, unless you're way faster than 60 seconds per drink or you're serving paint bucket sized lattes. I didn't compare the GS/3 and Linea Mini side-by-side. Under extreme load, I wouldn't be surprised if the GS/3 recovered more quickly than the Linea Mini given it's switchable to 20A and has a very large brew boiler (1.5L). It's speculation on my part, but I would also be surprised if a typical barista could get ahead of either espresso machine. For what it's worth, I know that Counter Culture Coffee plans to use the Linea Mini at events.
This is the part of Dan's review that I was thinking of.
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weebit_nutty

#13: Post by weebit_nutty »

AssafL wrote:I guess it may hold true if you are talking about the prosumer segment of the market vs. the professional segment of the market. I don't think pros would buy a LMLM.
agreed. I was referring strictly to prosumer as that was the only market I assumed the GS/3 was ever purchasing the machine. I didn't know pros bought the GS/3. I for one have never seen it used commercially, and I've been to quite a few establishments (not even in restaurants).. maybe popups/catering carts? I don't think any serious coffee shop would use a GS/3.
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AssafL

#14: Post by AssafL »

I have seen them in SO bars (along with a shot puller or two), and at restaurants. One I remember was in France in Paris. I think it had 2 Michelin Stars.

I think it takes up less room than a 2-3 group machine and if the deal flow is slow why wouldn't you?
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AssafL

#15: Post by AssafL »

I even seem to remember sight glass using them when they were just opening up (prior to getting the big machines).
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AssafL

#16: Post by AssafL »

I don't think thermoblocks is a derogatory term. When used for steam - perhaps.

I think it was a stroke of genius to use it in the Linea.

My main answer to the OP was about the differences between the machines. The two mixers and the additional boiler (and perhaps controller - but you could after market install that part) are the main differences technically speaking.

The parts are there for throughput. That is the main difference. You could probably wash the cups and spoons under the group and not change the temp. Like long flushes? Please do.

Is it worth 2500? Depends on your wallet and sensibilities.
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boost

#17: Post by boost »

weebit_nutty wrote:agreed. I was referring strictly to prosumer as that was the only market I assumed the GS/3 was ever purchasing the machine. I didn't know pros bought the GS/3. I for one have never seen it used commercially, and I've been to quite a few establishments (not even in restaurants).. maybe popups/catering carts? I don't think any serious coffee shop would use a GS/3.
Plenty of roasters and coffee shop actually has GS/3 or the Mini, you just dont see it in the shop. They were used quite out back for cupping room, special event etc. Not every event they do have 220V and plumb in connection.
Here is an example of an event with hundreds of people and multi roasters where they only use Linea Mini or GS/3s.
http://home.lamarzoccousa.com/la-marzoc ... ners-2016/

However for full blown shop the number one issue is almost always steam power, there is only so much you can pack into one group machine and 110V (in the US) at least. Back when Starbucks was using Lineas most are 3-4 groups machine, not because they use all the heads but for the steam power.

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russel

#18: Post by russel »

Describing the LMLM's brew boiler as a thermoblock doesn't reflect how it's actually dealing with heating the water. It's still a duel boiler with brew water already heated to brew temp. Instead of placing the heating element in the water, the element is in the boiler walls, which works because the boiler is small. Calling it a thermoblock suggests that brew water is heated OnDemand like a certain failed Kickstarter project (and the Decent machine as well?), which it isn't.

There's a very serious shop here is Boston that's using a GS3 because the volume doesn't demand more. I use mine for lab work, catering, and pop-ups - all of which are common commercial/professional uses for a GS3.
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JohnB.
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#19: Post by JohnB. »

AssafL wrote:But then again I would not replace mine - not with a Linea, not with a Londinium nor even a Bosco.
Of course not! You'd want the Bosco sitting next to your GS3. :lol:
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AssafL

#20: Post by AssafL »

russel wrote:Describing the LMLM's brew boiler as a thermoblock doesn't reflect how it's actually dealing with heating the water. It's still a duel boiler with brew water already heated to brew temp. Instead of placing the heating element in the water, the element is in the boiler walls, which works because the boiler is small. Calling it a thermoblock suggests that brew water is heated OnDemand like a certain failed Kickstarter project (and the Decent machine as well?), which it isn't.
I thought a thermoblock reflected the ratio of steel to water. If in a boiler the thermal mass is water - in a thermoblock it is metal. It does enable heating up of small quantities of water faster (as many here compared the speediness of a Linea and a GS3 that has a boiler's worth of water to heat up). As many here said - it is very convenient that the machine is up and running in under 10 minutes.

As for "on demand" and/or dual use (steam and brew) - they do mostly suck.
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