Strietman CT1 vs Olympia Cremina 67

Recommendations for espresso equipment buyers and upgraders.
hankg
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Postby hankg » Jan 21, 2017, 10:43 am

I have an Olympia Cremina 67 in pristine condition that has been producing some pretty spectacular coffee. I thought it would be the last machine I would consider until I discovered the Strietman CT1. I don't make milk drinks and the CT1 looks to be an even more more minimalist, more elegant, manual lever espresso machine. To those who have experience with both, a few questions...

    Quality of the espresso produced - how do they compare.

    Consistency and ease of use - It takes a couple of flushes and a sink shot for me to prep the Olympia to pull those transcendental shots. It's a lot of effort to get to 1 oz. of really good coffee. Will the CT1 get there faster? By the time the Olympia is in "the zone" I have water for maybe 4 shots. So not a house party machine.

    Possibility of pressure profiling - I have been looking at the Naked Pressure profiler for the Olympia Cremina 67. If this opens up new possibilities in control and consistency this might tip the scales in favor of sticking with the Cremina. Any experience on the impact of this mod on life with the Olympia?

RockyIII
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Postby RockyIII » Jan 21, 2017, 11:45 am

I have not used either machine, but by its design the Strietman definitely has the ultimate system for brew temperature control and stability.

I have thought about buying a Cremina, a beautiful little machine, and the new pressure gauge mod looks very useful. However, the brew temperature is apparently rather difficult to control or even measure, and I am sure that I would find that frustrating. I need steam for milk, so the Strietman is not an option for me.

Rocky

Neuromancer
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Postby Neuromancer » Jan 21, 2017, 11:54 am

You could also wait for paul pratts project and see how it compares with the streitman

erik82
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Postby erik82 » Jan 21, 2017, 12:20 pm

User bas has a CT1 and bought a C2011 Cremina a couple of months ago. Long story short he sold the Cremina and kept the CT1. It's in dutch but the whole story can be found here http://koffiepraat.nl/forum/viewtopic.php?f=58&t=7726.

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spressomon
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Postby spressomon » Jan 21, 2017, 12:26 pm

I would say for those wanting an open boiler set-up and at or near sea level (and obviously no steam ...) the difference might be debatable. But for higher elevation environs, a pressurized boiler is akin to comparing normally aspirated engine to forced induction. Of course also relative to the roast level/bean brew temp required.
No Espresso = Depresso

hankg
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Postby hankg » Jan 21, 2017, 1:02 pm

Aside from the attraction of a more focused design not having to accommodate a steamer or as per spressomom's comment (I'm at sea level) a pressurized boiler (design wise - less is more - I don't want complexity I don't use). The easy control of brew temperature seems like the biggest plus for the CT1 over the Cremina. If different roasts require different brew temperatures there is no way to easily adjust for that with the Cremina. Difficult to know what the actually brew temperature at the head is. I do have the stick on thermometer on the outside of the head but I'm not so sure that is an accurate display of what is happening internally.

I wonder if it would be possible to add a temperature readout to the pressure gauge on the Naked Pressure profiling mod for the Cremina? That would really give you all the info you need in real time without a bunch of digital gizmos.

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naked-portafilter
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Postby naked-portafilter » Jan 21, 2017, 2:02 pm

hankg wrote:I wonder if it would be possible to add a temperature readout to the pressure gauge on the Naked Pressure profiling mod for the Cremina? That would really give you all the info you need in real time without a bunch of digital gizmos.


Great idea. It's possible of course but you would need a battery/electricity for exact temp readings. Maybe you know that this experiment started exactly there (Olympia Cremina Temperature Study, Part 4). We wanted to put a thermocouple in the chamber below the piston. And as we get there came the idea we could measure another important parameter.

The CT1 is an amazing lever. If you know your Cremina (daily use), have a temp strip on the group you can fairly good reproduce your favourit shots with narrow brewing temp ranges.

hankg
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Postby hankg » Jan 21, 2017, 2:09 pm

What would the accuracy of an analog temp gauge be? + or - 1 degree or less accurate than that? Dual analog gauges would look the business with the Olympia.

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naked-portafilter
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Postby naked-portafilter » Jan 21, 2017, 2:13 pm

Analog temp measuring is way too slooooow for a coffee machine :-( (for usable readings of the brewing temps).

RyanP
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Postby RyanP » Jan 21, 2017, 2:15 pm

As somebody who has owned both and never used the steaming function, I can say I don't miss the Cremina. I pulled good shots with it, of course, but I don't miss the half pulls, ramekin cooling baths, imprecise temps, locking in of portafilter halfway up, smaller shot volumes, and other quirks unique to that type of machine. I find the CT1 to just be easier to use. It's as simple as switching the unit to on, waiting 7-10 min to heat up, locking in portafilter and pulling the shot when you are at the desired temp. Larger shot volume is a plus. I also just find that I get better results in the cup.

The two reasons I could see to go for the Cremina. 1. you want steaming capability. 2. you want ability to install a naked pressure profiling gauge. I admit the gauge would be fun to have. I sold my cremina, but have an old la pavoni that never sees the light of day and I've thought about installing the new gauge on it just to have some fun with, but I certainly don't see it as a necessity.