Profitec GO vs Gaggia Classic Evo Pro

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
Z099269
Posts: 7
Joined: 7 months ago

#1: Post by Z099269 »

Hello,

I am hoping to get advice on which machine would best suite me. I generally prefer light and medium roast espressos, which the Profitec GO would be fully capable of. However, it is at the top of my budget. Would the Gaggia Classic Evo Pro be able to deliver good results for those roast profiles? If not, would installing a PID put it on par with the Profitec GO? I'd like to get the best value for what I like to drink, but if I'm going to be spending a fair bit of money on something I plan on keeping for several years I'd rather sacrifice the extra money if that meant getting a machine that better fits my taste. Any advice/input would be greatly recommended.

Thank you all very much in advance,
Anthony

gobucks
Posts: 226
Joined: 2 years ago

#2: Post by gobucks »

I think you'd be much better served spending the extra on the Profitec Go. PID is crucial, especially if you want to be able to handle different roast levels. You can mod the Gaggia to use PID, but it's a bit janky, and will erase a chunk of the cost savings. The other big difference is the boiler size - 400ml brass on the profitec, 100ml aluminum on the Gaggia. The gaggia simply isn't going to have the temp stability, or the steam power, of the Profitec.
★ Helpful

Honeycomb
Posts: 33
Joined: 1 year ago

#3: Post by Honeycomb »

I am biased on this since I own a Profitec GO, but I was similarly cross shopping those machines. The big reasons I went with the GO are similar to what gobucks said, considerably better boiler & and overall more refined package. Fit, finish, and build materials will be on an entirely different level than that of gaggia as well.

If you are into milk drinks, the GO has an insulated steam wand (silicone tube w/ metal arm) which makes it a breeze for cleaning and ease of use.

If you have questions about the GO I'd be happy to answer them!

Z099269 (original poster)
Posts: 7
Joined: 7 months ago

#4: Post by Z099269 (original poster) »

Thank you for your help! That makes sense and definitely makes it clearer that I would rather opt for the Profitec GO. I have now narrowed down my choice to either the Profitec GO vs Lelit Victoria. They are the same price, but the Victoria has pre-infusion, which seems to be helpful for pulling light roast shots. Do you have an opinion on which might better suit my needs?

Z099269 (original poster)
Posts: 7
Joined: 7 months ago

#5: Post by Z099269 (original poster) »

Honeycomb,

Thank you for your help! I'm assuming that this machine excels with both dark roast and medium roast shots, but have you had any experience pulling light roast shots? I haven't found any comments anywhere about first hand experience with pulling light roasts on this machine, so that would be very helpful to get your feedback on that. I've read that pre-infusion is helpful for light roasts, but I don't know if that is a necessity. If it is important, I'd maybe consider the Lelit Victoria.

Also, roughly how long does your routine take from the time your GO is warmed up to the time you are finished with making a milk drink and cleanup?

Thank you very much, again!

Honeycomb
Posts: 33
Joined: 1 year ago

#6: Post by Honeycomb »

I'm not the most qualified to answer about the light roasts since I tend to gravitate more towards mediums for espresso, but I have used the lightest roasts from my local roasters and had no problems. Making adjustments on the PID and OPV are a breeze, so dialing it in for light roasts, turbo shots, etc... shouldn't be an issue.

Perfect excuse for an afternoon cortado :D

Timing everything relevant out -

From a completely cold start to boiler PID readout hitting 96 °C was about 7 minutes. Everything else was up to temp by about 12 minutes. Changeover from brew to steam @140 °C was 1 minute 38 seconds. Cleanup was a quick wipe and purge on the wand followed by refilling the boiler for 17 seconds, so maybe 30 seconds total?

A couple of things to keep in mind for this or the gaggia will be some of the SBDU quirks with steaming. Make sure you bleed a little water out of the boiler through the steam wand while warming up to steam to find yourself more head room in the boiler. Also, there isn't an auto refill on this machine. You'll need to run the pump for when done steaming to refill it with water.

Aside from those quirks there is only one 'gotcha' I'm aware of with this machine, there isn't any kind of low water cut-off for the reservoir. The machine will absolutely let you run the pump dry if the reservoir runs out.

kd8tzc
Posts: 9
Joined: 3 months ago

#7: Post by kd8tzc »

Honeycomb wrote:
Aside from those quirks there is only one 'gotcha' I'm aware of with this machine, there isn't any kind of low water cut-off for the reservoir. The machine will absolutely let you run the pump dry if the reservoir runs out.
Just curious, what happens when you do that?

coyote-1
Posts: 485
Joined: 2 years ago

#8: Post by coyote-1 replying to kd8tzc »

Potential damage to the heating element, as without water there's nothing to moderate it.

But lots of machines have this issue. The thing to do is get in the habit of refilling it after every use. With machines of this size, a full water tank has another benefit: it provides weight, which a) dampens pump noise, and b) can allow you to lock in or remove the portafilter with just one hand (without holding the machine stable in your other hand).

kd8tzc
Posts: 9
Joined: 3 months ago

#9: Post by kd8tzc »

Thanks.

Just curious, what type of portafilter comes with the Profitec GO? A pressurized or non-pressurized? I just ordered one from WLL, but the salesperson was not certain. He thought it would be non-pressurized (as would I), but I couldn't confirm.

Honeycomb
Posts: 33
Joined: 1 year ago

#10: Post by Honeycomb »

Non pressurized single, double, and blank for back flushing.