My, Oh My-Which Roaster should I buy?

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
LatteLlama
Posts: 13
Joined: 3 months ago

#1: Post by LatteLlama »

Okay so I want to start home roasting.
I did quit a bit of research and I'm currently pondering between:

1) Ikawa Home
2) Kaffelogic Nano7e

My Budget is around 1.500€ and ideally it is easy enough for a beginner like me but has the potential to learn and improve. Badge size around 100g is sufficient since I only want to roast for myself and family. It also should be small and home friendly (so my wife doesn't complain over my coffee corner slowly taking over the entire kitchen)

The Ikawa looks much more sophisticated. I'm concerned though regarding the sparse in-app data and ability to actually get into roasting. The Phases and their impact. RoR curves and the bunch.
The monthly price of the graph editor is fine for me (even though I don't like it) but I'm unsure if its "enough" to really learn and grow and adjust the profiles for greens outside of Ikawas shop.

The Kaffelogic has a much more DIY feeling. The workflow looks pretty awful in comparison BUT the software seems much more capable. There are more profiles and fine tunings available and a larger community pool of profiles to experiment with. The software seems much more "professional". Also It can roast batches up to 200g vs. 100g (not a must but a nice to have).

Any thoughts?
First Time Poster Hopefully I didn't make any mistakes :)

boren
Posts: 1075
Joined: 14 years ago

#2: Post by boren »

Have a look at these two:

https://bunafr.com/home-coffee-roaster/
https://www.kaleido-coffee.com/product/ ... ee-roaster

Both can roast a larger batch and offer very attractive features. I'm personally waiting for reviews on the Bunafr roaster. It seems amazing for the price ($900) and even includes first crack detection.

LatteLlama (original poster)
Posts: 13
Joined: 3 months ago

#3: Post by LatteLlama (original poster) »

@Boren

thank you for the quick reply! :D

The bunfar looks really interesting, Im just getting "to-good-to -be -true" vibes :) Maybe its worth waiting for though.

The Kaleido's are a bit to industrial for my small inne-rcity kitchen :) Otherwise they seem a good option!

Pressino
Supporter ♡
Posts: 1336
Joined: 3 years ago

#4: Post by Pressino »

If you have never roasted coffee before, my advice would be to avoid spending more than US$100 to US$150 on simple "manually controlled" roasting equipment" and start out roasting small batches in an electric popcorn popper, or better yet Sweet Marias "Popper," which allows you some control over temperature and fan speed. You could even get a stovetop popcorn popper or just a frying pan if you can deal with the smoke in your kitchen. This is a good way to familiarize yourself with the roast cycle and let you see if you actually like roasting coffee...before you spend a lot on something you might not like doing.

LatteLlama (original poster)
Posts: 13
Joined: 3 months ago

#5: Post by LatteLlama (original poster) »

@Pressino

thank you for your honest reply :) I don't want to start from scratch though. I took me long enough to learn how to pull good and great shots from my manual leaver machine, I don't want to start from 0 again.
My feeling is that modern home or sample roaster allow for really good results from the start. I just find it important to have the option to go deeper into the topic later (if I want to). To me the Ikawa seems to be better and easier to get into roasting but the data and adjustability seem limited. While the Kaffelogic requires more "getting used to" but offers a full suit of toggles and switches if I ever to choose to get deeper into it.

Your suggestions would definitely yield a better and more thorough learning curve but I'm okay to spend some more to not have to start from 0 :D

VirTERM
Posts: 55
Joined: 1 year ago

#6: Post by VirTERM »

I recently faced a similar decision and ultimately chose Kaffelogic for its customizable features. While Ikawa offers more sophisticated options, I prefer having more control.

ira
Team HB
Posts: 5467
Joined: 16 years ago

#7: Post by ira »

I started with an Ikawa Home, upgraded to an Ikawa Pro 100 but if I was to buy a machine today it would be the Kaffelogic Nano7e. Myself and another moderator spent 1/2 hour with the designer of that roaster and it seems like it's software is going to far surpass the useability of the Ikawa software. I've no idea how the stability of the Kaffelogic compares with the Ikawas which are about the most repeatable piece of hardware I've ever seen.

There are a few long threads on the Ikawa home that show how to create profiles that do what you want, had those been around when I owned my Home, I'd probably not have upgraded to the Pro. But I've pretty much settled on one profile that seems to do an excellent job of roasting coffee that I'm happy drinking and it repeats that profile perfectly every time I press go.

LatteLlama (original poster)
Posts: 13
Joined: 3 months ago

#8: Post by LatteLlama (original poster) »

@VirTERM
It's where I'm also currently leaning :)

bongani
Posts: 116
Joined: 10 years ago

#9: Post by bongani »

LatteLlama wrote:@Pressino

thank you for your honest reply :) I don't want to start from scratch though. I took me long enough to learn how to pull good and great shots from my manual leaver machine, I don't want to start from 0 again.
My feeling is that modern home or sample roaster allow for really good results from the start. I just find it important to have the option to go deeper into the topic later (if I want to). To me the Ikawa seems to be better and easier to get into roasting but the data and adjustability seem limited. While the Kaffelogic requires more "getting used to" but offers a full suit of toggles and switches if I ever to choose to get deeper into it.

Your suggestions would definitely yield a better and more thorough learning curve but I'm okay to spend some more to not have to start from 0 :D
I agree with your sentiment. Any of the two roasters in your shortlist are solid performers. Also, they have a community of regular updates for modifying and introducing new beans and profiles.

Whilst agreeing with the skillet on your stove and poppers, you don't have the flexibility afforded by your choice of roasters. I enjoy the skillet experience, it's a hit and miss at times, but you can rest assured of the repeatable results from your roaster choice.

Me? I would take the Ikawa. The Pro150x.

LatteLlama (original poster)
Posts: 13
Joined: 3 months ago

#10: Post by LatteLlama (original poster) »

@Ira
Do you think the adjustability and profile adjustment capability of the Ikawa Home would be "enough" with the additional resources today ? I found this great website programmed by a member that allowed for profile customisation on a notebook including temperature and fan speed for the home. I also understand that it's possible to copy pro profiles over to the Ikawa home (as a workaround).
My remaining uncertainty comes from two factors:
1) Multiple people reported inconsistenced results from the Ikawa Home using greens outside of the Ikawa shop
2) the Adjustability with 6 Temperature points seems limited in comparison to the Kaffeelogic.

I just don't know if I really would taste the difference of a Kaffelogic profile vs. An Ikawa Home Profile. How much of an impact in the cup is the lack of "infinite" temperature points and accurate Bean Temperature and all the other kaffelogic adjustments gonna make? I know that of course also dependents on how deep I'm willing to get into the topic. The Kaffelogic team simple provides so much additional resources and pdfs. But the workflow and optic of the Ikawa is so much nicer.

I find that really difficult :)
Thank you for the help! This forum has been incredibly helpful!