La Marzocco GS/3 or Slayer one group? - Page 3

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
michael

#21: Post by michael »

I had understood that if you preorder now or relatively soon, you can get your choice of powder coat included in the $8500 price; if you don't specify an option on the Xs, how do they come 8)

Londonplug

#22: Post by Londonplug »

Compass Coffee wrote:Getting multiple PM requests for Slayer price list so posting it here.
Very nice

I think i would have to wait for a divorce before i get one of these with a few options on my worktop, a new washing machine for her aint going to smooth this one over

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#23: Post by Compass Coffee » replying to Londonplug »

Diamond, 2+ carat might do the trick. :lol:

Then again Debi's center stone already a 2 carat marquise with 1.64 carat tw baguette & round ring guard and no Slayer or Speedster here! :? But she got that almost 14 years ago (for our 20th) and it's bargaining power long since gone plus was before I turned impoverished coffee professional LOL...
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shadowfax

#24: Post by shadowfax »

michael wrote:I had understood that if you preorder now or relatively soon, you can get your choice of powder coat included in the $8500 price; if you don't specify an option on the Xs, how do they come 8)
That is correct on the body panel powder coating. If you preorder, you do get to select an alternate powder coating color included in the price. As for the Xs, they come as cast aluminum, which I assume is anodized. I think the price for anodizing them in the price list is if you want them anodized a different color, like pink or aquamarine.
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Peppersass
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#25: Post by Peppersass »

shadowfax wrote:The needle valve gives you a feature that you won't have on a GS3, or any other machine, out of the box-the ability to control not preinfusion pressure (at least, not directly), but the time it takes to come to preinfusion pressure-the time during which water is delivered to the group, but not quickly enough that any pressure builds at all. This is what Slayer means by "flow" profiling. The Slayer V3 gives you 2 flow rates that you can toggle between, one of which is configurable (by adjusting the needle valve).

This is a really interesting prospect to me; I've been meaning to start a discussion about it for a month or so. It's also not something that you can get with pump-controlled "pressure profiling," which is all I have ever played with.
I think it would be more accurate to say that the the Slayer needle valve allows you to reduce the flow rate below the minimum free flow rate dictated by line pressure and the gicleur, and that pump-controlled pressure profiling machines do not.

With my homebrew GS/3 manual gear pump profiling mod, I can set a repeatable free flow rate anywhere between the line free flow rate and the free flow rate at 12 BAR (where the OPV is set.) Thus I can set the preinfusion flow rate anywhere in that range. But I can't go below the line flow rate. That would require a needle valve, but as you say it wouldn't be hard to add one.

Anvan

#26: Post by Anvan »

Slayer? Speedster? GS/3? None of these machines provides anything remotely resembling a defensible financial return-on-investment, so all the dividends from this choice will be found in the "happiness" quadrant.

So first you solve the mundane practical questions such as counter space and cupboard clearance, available voltages, plumbing and if you have sufficient air conditioning to leave it on all summer. After that though, it's more about deciding if the cost of happiness-sub-(a) is really worth more than you'd spend on happiness-sub-(b) plus three Roburs tossed in for the same amount of cash - and just imagine how that trio would rock your kitchen.

And is your personality one that appreciates the reliability and security of a (relatively anyway) large user base filled with a community who can already tell you how to drill out valve shafts and if you want the brown versus the black O-Rings and where to find the maintenance videos and how to install a gear-drive pump? Or does that just take the edge off the happiness quotient because your joy is to invent all that stuff fresh for yourself and you prefer the road less-traveled or hell, less constructed? Or maybe you just look at Kees' production values and you gotta have one and that's all there is to it.

There's no excuse. But there are a lot of reasons. If you've got the means, don't worry: whatever, the coffee will taste great and even the wrong decision won't be the end of the world - even if your explorations sail you off the edge of it. At this level, it's got to be about fun, and you can always tell yourself that red sports cars with 12 cylinders and white yachts with 24 of them are far more expensive but, in the end, far less useful. After all, this is about coffee.

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JohnB.
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#27: Post by JohnB. »

shadowfax wrote: The needle valve gives you a feature that you won't have on a GS3, or any other machine, out of the box-the ability to control not preinfusion pressure (at least, not directly), but the time it takes to come to preinfusion pressure-the time during which water is delivered to the group, but not quickly enough that any pressure builds at all.
You should have fun playing with that feature. While the Spirit is basically a multigroup Speedster Kees changed the jetting set up by removing the .6mm jet from the group leaving the jet holder empty & replacing the 1.5mm jet in the HX to brew boiler feed line with the .6mm jet. With this jetting P/I starts at near zero pressure & slowly builds to line pressure. When you combine this jetting set up with the Speedster's Progressive Pre Infusion Cylinder (which isn't used on the Spirit) the ramp to full pressure is further slowed. When I engage manual P/I the puck is initially soaked by near zero pressure water which then takes a full 12 seconds to reach the 3 bar line pressure my regulator is set for if I let it run it's full course. While not as slick as the needle valve solution this does give me some manual control over the P/I pressure ramp & allows the puck to be fully saturated at well below line pressure.

This set up also gives a nice slow ramp to full pump pressure if I engage the pump function directly.
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Gary S.

#28: Post by Gary S. »

JohnB. wrote:While the Spirit is basically a multigroup Speedster Kees changed the jetting set up by removing the .6mm jet from the group leaving the jet holder empty & replacing the 1.5mm jet in the HX to brew boiler feed line with the .6mm jet. With this jetting P/I starts at near zero pressure & slowly builds to line pressure.
So John...just curious...if buying now, would this feature move you to choose the Spirit over the Speedster, assuming no other constraints?

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JohnB.
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#29: Post by JohnB. »

No, I have no need for a multi group machine & I prefer the looks of the Speedster. Besides it only took me 20 minutes to convert the Speedster jetting to Spirit spec & I get the added benefit of the PPI Chamber. If you were ordering a new Speedster you could just have the Spirit jetting installed when it's built.
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Dieter01 (original poster)

#30: Post by Dieter01 (original poster) »

Pulled the trigger on the Slayer. Yellow/orange powder coat with Peruvian Walnut and powder coated silver X. All were standard options (except custom powder coat which is only complimentary now during the pre-order phase). The standard X has just recently been changed to a powder coated silver that looks like this: