La Marzocco GS3 MP or Slayer vs any E61 double boiler PID espresso machine with a Flow Control Device installed - Page 4

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
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JB90068
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#31: Post by JB90068 »

another_jim wrote:Your second statement makes no sense; unless you're OK with an inflatable Slayer toy on your counter.
I beg to differ here. I think aesthetics for some of us are part of the whole package of form and function. Take for example a kitchen. There are those that are happy with a simple GE electric stove, while others spend top dollar to buy a La Cornue Chateau. Both cook food and then the rest of the time sit inactive. If you take cooking seriously and see a Chateau sitting in a beautifully designed and crafted kitchen, you might be thrilled. I know I was the first time I saw one. Or say the difference between a Timex and a Patek. They both tell time but for some, the Patek looks a whole lot nicer and is worth the hefty price difference.

I wish I had the space to put a KVDW or a Leva X1 on my countertop just for the added aesthetic visual pleasure it would bring me. The function upgrade also goes without saying, but when it comes just to my palate, it might be a case of diminishing returns. That said, I would appreciate it whenever I looked at it.
Old baristas never die. They just become over extracted.

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another_jim
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#32: Post by another_jim »

If you don't know how to cook; the Thermidor is eye candy pure and simple, sitting in your kitchen to show off your taste. I've been in many a kitchen with 100Ks worth of pro gear, where you had to do a 440 to make a sandwich, since it was laid out for showing off, not cooking. So ...
JB90068 wrote: If you take cooking seriously and see a La Cornue Chateau sitting in a beautifully designed and crafted kitchen
... more often than not, you'll be going :roll:
Jim Schulman

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JB90068
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#33: Post by JB90068 »

another_jim wrote:If you don't know how to cook; the Thermidor is eye candy pure and simple, sitting in your kitchen to show off your taste. I've been in many a kitchen with 100Ks worth of pro gear, where you had to do a 440 to make a sandwich, since it was laid out for showing off, not cooking. So ...


... more often than not, you'll be going :roll:
Point well made. Form should never outweigh function although they can be conjoined.
Old baristas never die. They just become over extracted.

Primacog (original poster)

#34: Post by Primacog (original poster) »

cmin wrote:I've always wonder how that made their shots taste, kinda like lever'ish in a way?
There are quite a lot of KVDW machines where I am at and the coffee rhey produce has always been very good to great depending on the cafes. I haven't detected much of a lever profile in the ones that I have tasted though my palate isn't the most sensitive or refined.
LMWDP #729

Primacog (original poster)

#35: Post by Primacog (original poster) »

cmin wrote:At least with the Slayer its PI system is unmatched unless your modded (needle and gear pump mods etc). An E61 w/ FC device sure as heck isn't even coming remotley close to that lol. It'll let you set the needle valve at whatever X flow point you set (ie 2g/s) and when going to pre-brew mode allows that at flawlessly controlled pressure and flow rate than slap into full brew to finish, that's what makes Slayer shot unlike anything else th. Not even the long PI mode on the DE1 is the same (the slayer style pull), we did side by side, DE1 also struggled and choked on the same grind setting for the Slayer. But, that's a bit of its negative as that's all it can do and really excelled for light med and light roast, can do darker roast and just pull normal and flip back to pre-brew to lower flow etc. If someone really want to profile all around yeah DE1 will slap it there, or even my slayer mod BDB as you have full manual control (or programmed with DE1)

I had a GS3 modded. I find myself leaning towards levers though now. Almost bought the R24 since you don't have to plumb and it has the advanced profiling and PI adjustment which is unique for a lever, but I have no room temporarily in this kitchen. But every time I've had a shot off a Londinium just been amazing, almost like you'd have to purposely try to pull a bad shot to get a bad shot.

Thanks cmin. So from the sound of it, the slayer specialises in one trick ans thay was its design brief but it's unfair to call it a one trick pony since it basically does the preinfusion blooming shot better than anything else...

Can I emulate it with my spring lever by pulling the lever down and leaving it there to infuse the puck - will this be like the pre brew function in the slayer? And once I release the levee will it eb akin to engaging the brew function in the slayer?
LMWDP #729

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NelisB

#36: Post by NelisB »

Primacog wrote:I haven't detected much of a lever profile
How does a lever profile taste compared to a pump machine?

Primacog (original poster)

#37: Post by Primacog (original poster) » replying to NelisB »

To me, the taste seems to be thicker substance to it, but smoother at the same time. I tend to use the same beans fir my e61 pump machine and my spring lever and I use the same model of grinder to grind the beans for both so most of the other factors are held constant.
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JohnB.
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#38: Post by JohnB. »

NelisB wrote:How does a lever profile taste compared to a pump machine?
I find the flavors from the Bosco shots are more blended compared to the Speedster which will highlight the individual flavors more & produce a thicker mouthfeel. Both machines produce excellent shots but they are different so it's interesting to switch machines every few days with the same beans/blends.
LMWDP 267

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NelisB

#39: Post by NelisB » replying to JohnB. »

That's how I would describe the Speedster shots too. Individual flavors with a big mouthfeel. For me that's the perfect shot.

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BaristaBoy E61

#40: Post by BaristaBoy E61 »

another_jim wrote:Your first statement makes good sense; for a hobbyist, the process is at least as enjoyable as the outcome. Your second statement makes no sense; unless you're OK with an inflatable Slayer toy on your counter.

I would bet that like myself, there are many on this website that still enjoy taking the occasional peek at their espresso setup just before heading to bed because they still enjoy the thrill of looking at it.

And for the record, I wouldn't want anything 'inflatable' in the kitchen - or anywhere else in the house! :mrgreen:
"You didn't buy an Espresso Machine - You bought a Chemistry Set!"