If you had to start over with espresso and buy an entire setup with a budget of $5000, what would you buy? - Page 4

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
Arafel

#31: Post by Arafel »

Carter wrote:What's your reasoning for Barista pro baskets over ims/vst? I have trouble figuring out which is best
I've used them and like them, I guess. I think they are well-made, and like the nanotech.

Carter (original poster)

#32: Post by Carter (original poster) »

yoshi005 wrote:For that budget my recommendstion would be:

a) plumb-in spring lever (either Vintage or a londinium compressa or Bosco)
b) a unimodal flat burr single dosing grinder (Lagom P64, Ultra grinder)

With that set-up you have a highly consistent, silent package which is well suited for medium to dark roasted espresso as well as for filter coffee.

The best with lever machines is that you will leave the rabbit hole immediately and leave the discussions about upgrading your gear to others... That gives you time and patience to concentrate on the coffee.

Kind regatds, Jochen
I'm not sure if I'll be able to plumb the machine, and i was considering a Londinium but they're too large for my space, sadly a Synchronika would be the largest I could accommodate.

I am also looking to do light roasts in addition to darker roasts

Concentrating on the coffee itself is the ideal for me, I like your ideology

Thanks Jochen

Carter (original poster)

#33: Post by Carter (original poster) »

Arafel wrote:I've used them and like them, I guess. I think they are well-made, and like the nanotech.
Fair enough, the nanotech is interesting.

Thanks!

fiechtl5

#34: Post by fiechtl5 »

I am going to echo the lever lovers on here. If I were to start with that budget, first thing would be a commercial lever. The Profitec Pro 800 seems like a good choice at $2900. For a grinder, I am a fan of flats. Bang for the buck, I think I would choose the Option-O Lagom. This allows a few burr choices as I figured out what type of espresso I liked. Finally, I have been a very big fan of the Lunar scales. They are just better feeling and seem like a premium product. The remaining would be spent on a barista hustle tamper, and WPM handleless milk pitcher. I would rack up some rewards points and fill in the odds and ends down the road (knockbox, tamping mat, other desired accessories).

SpecC

#35: Post by SpecC »

I was just in the same boat and had the same reservations with the decent as you. I went with it however as I felt worst case I just sell it and buy a lever or something I like the aesthetic of more. Won't really lose but a few hundred dollars.

That said I've never made espresso in my life and by watching videos, and reading here, even my first shot was pretty solid. I've yet to have one even close to undrinkable. I like the feedback I get from the graphs because I can easier tell what's going on.

It looks pretty "meh". No denying that. But it's been pretty great to use and learn on.

Carter (original poster)

#36: Post by Carter (original poster) »

fiechtl5 wrote:I am going to echo the lever lovers on here. If I were to start with that budget, first thing would be a commercial lever. The Profitec Pro 800 seems like a good choice at $2900. For a grinder, I am a fan of flats. Bang for the buck, I think I would choose the Option-O Lagom. This allows a few burr choices as I figured out what type of espresso I liked. Finally, I have been a very big fan of the Lunar scales. They are just better feeling and seem like a premium product. The remaining would be spent on a barista hustle tamper, and WPM handleless milk pitcher. I would rack up some rewards points and fill in the odds and ends down the road (knockbox, tamping mat, other desired accessories).
A big issue for me with a lever is that, at least for the ones I want, they are too large for my space

Why do you prefer the handleless milk pitcher? Nice choices overall though

Carter (original poster)

#37: Post by Carter (original poster) »

SpecC wrote:I was just in the same boat and had the same reservations with the decent as you. I went with it however as I felt worst case I just sell it and buy a lever or something I like the aesthetic of more. Won't really lose but a few hundred dollars.

That said I've never made espresso in my life and by watching videos, and reading here, even my first shot was pretty solid. I've yet to have one even close to undrinkable. I like the feedback I get from the graphs because I can easier tell what's going on.

It looks pretty "meh". No denying that. But it's been pretty great to use and learn on.
Yeah I'm slowly starting to think similarly. As much as I am not in love with the aesthetics or sound, getting acceptable shots and improving will be a hell of a lot easier on the Decent compared to any other machine. If it really bothers me I could sell it and pick up something else.

Quester

#38: Post by Quester » replying to Carter »

The sound was a bit weird for me at first, but now I associate it with the cool functionality of the machine.

fiechtl5

#39: Post by fiechtl5 »

Carter wrote:A big issue for me with a lever is that, at least for the ones I want, they are too large for my space

Why do you prefer the handleless milk pitcher? Nice choices overall though
Levers are certainly tall! If space is a concern, rumor has it (and has had it for the past 2 years...) that the londinium compact spring lever will be released before the end of the year. Not sure if that would be in my 5k game plan though.

I find that a grab pitchers from the top and bypass the handle. The WPM allows me to hold closer to the spout. No clue if it helps, but it feels better to me than holding a handle. That being said, I also like the small motta for cortados.

Carter (original poster)

#40: Post by Carter (original poster) » replying to fiechtl5 »

It's not even the height that's the issue, it's the depth that's the killer for me.

The londinium compact is a thought, but again not sure of the dimensions and if it's plumb only that could pose an issue