I told you so... - Page 3

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
zin1953

#21: Post by zin1953 »

Presuming, David, that you're flying for Delta . . . if your flights ever happen to land at SFO -- or better yet, OAK 'cuz SFO is fogged in -- come on over and you can play on my Elektra.

In the meantime, take a deep breath, relax, and remember that we have ALL suffered from "information overload" right before we took the plunge! But most of us still lunged somewhat blindly, not having an SCAA conveniently nearby! :wink:

So take it easy, and ENJOY!
A morning without coffee is sleep. -- Anon.

Phaelon56

#22: Post by Phaelon56 »

David - if the typical Type A hasn't even reached your alphabet then I doubt you'd be happy with a Superauto - even for a little while. In light of the fact that you travel as part of your work you might Google Coffee fest and check their schedule. It's not on the massive scale of SCAA but you're bound to be near one before April and you'll be able to see and play with some of the machines you've been reading about.

If you're a person who is prone to upgrade-itis in general (not just on coffee gear) then you'll undoubtedly have a few misgivings even after buying a carefully researched prosumer home machine. But no matter which one you buy... if you can budget $300 to $700 for a grinder and $1K to $2K for the machine you'll be able to get very good drinks after a relatively short learning period. But no matter what superauto you buy you'll have limited options as far as tweaking your technique and improving results - it's just the way it is.

If you have a chance try to get over to Octane for an espresso or a cappa - they are doing it right. I think they're over near Georgia Tech. I've tried a few different indy coffee shops in Atlanta and they were the only one I tried who was delivering very good drinks.

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dmj (original poster)

#23: Post by dmj (original poster) »

zin1953 wrote:Presuming, David, that you're flying for Delta . . . if your flights ever happen to land at SFO -- or better yet, OAK 'cuz SFO is fogged in -- come on over and you can play on my Elektra.

In the meantime, take a deep breath, relax, and remember that we have ALL suffered from "information overload" right before we took the plunge! But most of us still lunged somewhat blindly, not having an SCAA conveniently nearby! :wink:

So take it easy, and ENJOY!
Thanks for the offer. I'm in Portland, OR for the evening, and I'm headed to Stumptown. I think part of my real problem is that I have not consistently had good espresso. So the super is appealing, as it has been suggested that one will routinely be better than *$. And that's my comparison point. Other than the occasional foray into Italy, where I'm not sure if the espresso was really better of if the ambiance just made everything taste better, I can't really say if I like really good espresso. So, I need to drink some. The places near my home use super and semi-autos. I've never had a hand-made espresso, to my knowledge. I'm going to hit every high end place I can find (and I'm sure there is at least one in Atlanta, Octane, but I haven't made it there yet). And after I try what is generally regarded as good, I'm going to find somewhere I can try a shot from a super, and then I'm going to impose on anyone I can find who makes their own, and try theirs. And then I'll probably change my mind and take up trying to make beer. If you make a bad beer, and drink enough of it, you forget it's bad.

I thought I had decided to go with plan B and get a superauto, but I had a better look at prices and thought "Holy $%^&, that much for a good one?!?" If I'm going to spend $2k, I need to just get a Vivaldi, and then I think what about my wife, and I'm back to square one and I haven't bought anything. Did I mention I belong to Mensa? If they knew about this they'd kick me out.

So I'll keep looking and keep reading and keep drinking (espresso AND beer) and we'll see what it takes to get me to do something...

dmj (original poster)

#24: Post by dmj (original poster) »

zin1953 wrote:Presuming, David, that you're flying for Delta . . . if your flights ever happen to land at SFO -- or better yet, OAK 'cuz SFO is fogged in -- come on over and you can play on my Elektra.
Oh, and I forgot to add, I do fly for Delta, and periodically get to SFO, OAK, AND San Jose which I think is closest to Berkeley. I may take you up...

JTom

#25: Post by JTom »

David,

Oakland is closest to Berkley.

Out of the airport - go North - On the East side of the bay across from SF.

I feel your "pain." I am in the same boat as you, although I am not considering a semi-auto, I have a problem getting WAF on a $500 grinder and a $1,500 machine.

I sold her on tower speakers, so anything is possible. She also is a milk based coffee drinker.

Good hunting.

Have you checked out Dave on e-bay selling Quick Mill machines with a PID?

dmj (original poster)

#26: Post by dmj (original poster) »

Tom,
Thanks for the info. I get to all of the airports, but more by chance than choice. I bid for days off and working conditions, and then just follow the aircraft, but I might be able to get into OAK. We actually stay in Emeryville, near the bridge BTW.

Funny you mentioned speakers; we just bought a home theater as well, so you're right: anything is possible.

As for the machine, I looked everywhere. Here, Amazon, Craigslist, eBay, 1st in Coffee, Sweet Maria's, Williams Sonoma, Target, Sears, Home Depot (just kidding on that one). Anyway, I finally decided that life is too short and just bought a Jura S9. The reviews and recommendations were good enough. Some time spent with a salesman from 1st in Coffee tipped the scales.

I also went to Stumptown in Portland and had an espresso. That was the straw, I think. It was good, but not so good that I'd walk a mile past a *$ to get there. And not so good that I think I'll cough up a lung drinking the output from the Jura:

https://www.coffeegeek.com/proreviews/d ... capressos9

So for me, I'm set for the near future. I'll be here looking for beans and looking for more espresso houses. After the April SCAA, I may decide to get a proper machine. If I find I need one or want one, I'll get one. I'll post a review of the S9 after I muck around with it for a bit, but I think most folks here would be uninterested. None the less, there might be someone else who is interested in automation and convenience. We'll see...

dmj (original poster)

#27: Post by dmj (original poster) »

BrewHaHa wrote:Hi, David-

If you haven't seen it, there's a long, detailed review of the Jura Capresso S9 Super-Automatic over on coffeegeek:
https://www.coffeegeek.com/proreviews/d ... capressos9

More than simply a review of that particular model, it gives the reader a good idea of what to consider in choosing a Super-Automatic, compared to other super-autos as well as to traditional espresso machines.

Best of luck, and have fun!

-John
Thanks John. I think that did the trick.

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zin1953

#28: Post by zin1953 »

dmj wrote:Tom,
Thanks for the info. I get to all of the airports, but more by chance than choice. I bid for days off and working conditions, and then just follow the aircraft, but I might be able to get into OAK. We actually stay in Emeryville, near the bridge BTW.
Approx. 5 miles from my house.
A morning without coffee is sleep. -- Anon.

dmj (original poster)

#29: Post by dmj (original poster) »

Thanks. I'll let you know if I get to OAK. It may be a few months as they move the jets around based on loads. Seems like we're in OAK more in the spring and summer...

dj

IMAWriter
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#30: Post by IMAWriter »

David...I'm not sure as the SCAA is geared more to professionals and such, that you'll get a lot of "hands on" time. These folks are there to do business with others that do business, and so forth.
My wife won't touch my setup, even though I've explained the process, bribed, etc. Realizing you won't be home a lot, I think either the HX machine with the best steaming specs, or the La Spaz is the best choice.
Of course, to complicate matters further, you could get a used manual lever such as an older (1981-91) Olympia Cremina, which steams like a demon. 10oz of milk stretches to 14 and is ready in less than 30 seconds.
Total cost for a perfectly refurbed Cremina...less than 1k. leaving you $500-600 for the grinder of your choice.
Don't forget a proper tamper, milk pitcher, brushes, etc...another $100-150.
The Cremina is a classic, Swiss made gem. Much less maintenance is necessary.
The only caveat besides a bit of learning curve...not that bad, really....is that it is not designed to be left on all day. However, it is ready to pull shots in around 10 minutes.
Now that I've really got your head swimming... :lol:
BTW, the reason many folks have multiple machines is the reaon you've had SO many replies here. Simply, there are many different ways to climb the same hill, at least when it comes to good espresso drinks.
Rob
LMWDP #187
www.robertjason.com