Decent Tamper v3 - Page 2

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
mivanitsky
Supporter ❤

#11: Post by mivanitsky »

I like the weak spring approach, which Kafatek also takes with their LevTamp. It allows good tactile feedback to feel the coffee compressing as you tamp, and when it has stopped. Full compaction should be the endpoint of tamping, rather than a specific tamp pressure. At this point, the Decent V3 should be a good choice.

Iowa_Boy

#12: Post by Iowa_Boy »

gunda wrote:I have no personal experience of using a distribution tool as a tamper. I have read reports of those who do. Supposedly it's possible provided the tool is adjustable. I don't get the sense that it's a common approach.

The other option for a calibrated and leveling tamper is the Bravo:
Bravo Tamper

I haven't bothered with either the Force or the Bravo as the Decent V2 works well enough for me, and should be easier to use when I get my hands on a V3 spring for it.
I have the V2 but thought the spring is not replaceable. Am I incorrect?

User avatar
N6GQ
Supporter

#13: Post by N6GQ »

Jeff wrote:Maybe I'm missing something, but I believe that the DE v2/3 tampers, the Bravo, and others like the Espro are all "calibrated" or, perhaps better described as "force-indicating" tampers that all work on the same basic principle. There's a pre-loaded, compression spring inside. When the force on the handle exceeds the preload, the spring compresses further, generally a small amount, and you feel the thunk or click as the handle hits the lower stop.

As I understand it, The Force Tamper is different. Despite its name, it is an impulse tamper. A spring gets compressed which then "fires" the tamper against the puck. The puck absorbs the energy, compressing as it does.
That's my understanding too, the Force tamper being analogous to a window punch, and the others somewhat loosely analogous to a torque wrench.
LMWDP #614

Quester

#14: Post by Quester »

Coffee sticks more easily to my Decent tamper than other tampers I've used. The surface looks good, so I'm not sure why this is the case, or whether it's a fluke with mine.

gunda

#15: Post by gunda »

Iowa_Boy wrote:I have the V2 but thought the spring is not replaceable. Am I incorrect?
I thought so too but apparently it's possible. There are some instructions around somewhere, perhaps here on HB. Loctite was used to make it hard to take it apart, and you need to dissolve that. I won't know how easy or hard it is until I have a V3 spring and give it a try.

gunda

#16: Post by gunda »

Jeff wrote:Maybe I'm missing something, but I believe that the DE v2/3 tampers, the Bravo, and others like the Espro are all "calibrated" or, perhaps better described as "force-indicating" tampers that all work on the same basic principle.
The Decent V2 & V3 are not calibrated. The spring is just for leveling. I wouldn't describe my V2 as "force-indicating". If anything the spring is "force-concealing" as the spring is sufficiently stiff that it makes it hard to sense the actual tamp pressure, hence the change to a weaker spring in V3. The Decent V1 is calibrated, but isn't leveling.

Jeff

#17: Post by Jeff »

Thanks, yes, on carefully going through the videos, there are v1 and v2/v3 descriptions intermingled. The change of spring location does, as you state, remove the DE v2/3 from the group of "force-indicating" tampers.

dak

#18: Post by dak »

Iowa_Boy wrote:I have the V2 but thought the spring is not replaceable. Am I incorrect?

I have a V2 which I modified the spring on. With mine I used a very light spring. When I tamp the spring doesn't return the leveling plate until I give it a nudge. I like this because it allows me to tamp, then slightly rotate the tamper to polish the puck and remove any coffee from the tamper surface without having to continue to apply force down on the puck (just the weight of the tamper). When I remove the tamper off the puck I just give the leveling plate a nudge and it return to its place.

Iowa_Boy

#19: Post by Iowa_Boy »

dak wrote: I have a V2 which I modified the spring on. With mine I used a very light spring. When I tamp the spring doesn't return the leveling plate until I give it a nudge. I like this because it allows me to tamp, then slightly rotate the tamper to polish the puck and remove any coffee from the tamper surface without having to continue to apply force down on the puck (just the weight of the tamper). When I remove the tamper off the puck I just give the leveling plate a nudge and it return to its place.
How did you take it apart to replace the spring? I have a bunch of extra decent springs (including some of the lighter weight) that I bought when I thought it was easy to replace.

frank20

#20: Post by frank20 » replying to Iowa_Boy »

I was able to take mine apart by pressing down to compress the spring and turn the handle counter-clockwise at the same time. Probably best achieved my sandwiching between both hands. Good luck