Best espresso machine for light roasts? - Page 2

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
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spressomon

#11: Post by spressomon »

Its much easier to make consistently delicious espresso from medium to medium-dark roast beans...

...and a big difference in the amount of chinga, relative to the equipment costs needed in each camp.

I'll certainly get some push back, but from where I sit, you're going to have to up your budget by multiples. Big multiples.
No Espresso = Depresso

Quester

#12: Post by Quester »

luvmy40 wrote:BTW, make sure the BDB is the 920 and not the 900 model, unless it's stupid cheap.
It might be helpful to explain. Are you thinking about the group head gasket issue and that sort of thing?

I have a modded 900 series BDB. It was a silly easy mod. It's certainly harder to control than the DE1 and shots are not as consistent, but it sometimes produces shots that rival the best ones I've pulled on the DE1.

beanEFIL (original poster)

#13: Post by beanEFIL (original poster) »

I'm with you... I'll stick with a more manual approach... for now at least...
Maybe after a few yrs... I'll look into things then... but for me at least... it takes a while.. for anything with a tech-heavy operation... to "prove" itself in the field (since now there's a DUAL "reliability bar"... 1) machine hardware 2) software/tech)...
Anywho... I see MANY of you have the niche zero... so do you think this might be a good fit for me?
I took a look... via their website... I like it.
Then again... there are a few others I also like... ahhhhh this is SO hard why is there so much great gear?!!

The machine... still researching... utilizing everyone's input... so thank you....

I do think it's important to mention ... I HAVE NO USE FOR STEAM (I have a Breville if I need foam... a spoonful on top and voila... or n/a) I only need to make espresso.. plain and simple... "no workhorse req'd"... I make 2 shots per day... that's it.
From what I'm reading... it sounds like a single broiler is better then?? Is the dual only better for "making more shots" or actual quality PER shot??

Thanks-in-advance... again....

M60smurf

#14: Post by M60smurf »

So there are a lot of good suggestions. Like yourself, I am pour over first in my coffee approach. I have a niche zero, but for lighter roasts I think most people prefer something with flat burrs like the DF64. I currently use the cafelat robot, which allows for lever profiles, preinfusion etc. I find that on the lower budget side a manual machine like the robot or the flair58 are really tough to out perform. I routinely dial in light roasted SOs almost as easily as traditional espressos with the niche and robot. My only potential upgrade would be for the decent if I decide to go down that rabbit hole... Obviously the big question is does the manual workflow bother you? But the fact you enjoy pour over and only pull a few shots per week tells me you don't mind the "process". So a manual machine allows for a lot of control which is important when dialing in light roast espresso.

beanEFIL (original poster)

#15: Post by beanEFIL (original poster) »

I LIVE FOR THE WORK!
I LOVE THE PROCESS!
I want the control... all of it! hahaha

I don't make pour-overs anymore... just pull 2 shots... per day...
Once I discovered... I could pull shots that were better than what I was getting from the drip... I was hooked.

I need better gear not only to play and fiddle... and make better shots... but to pay homage to the beans... give them...on the end of their journey... the same TLC... they've received along the way.
Make sense?
You know... be a good host... bring my guest into a clean, happy home...
Right now... I feel embarrassed ... like...the beans came allll this way... to MY house... and I'm like.. um welcome to my shack... have a seat on the floor... hahaha. With a nice grinder and machine I can be like... come in! Sit on my cozy couch... here's some prosciutto and buffalo mozzerella...

Ok so... thanks for the 2 cents... I'll look into flat burrs... compare w/niche and the few others in my top 5... and the machines you mention...
I mean... most anything is going to be a mega upgrade from what I have now! hahaha

I think I'll get the grinder first. Take the advice of a fellow poster. Get used to it... then... get the new machine.
I've had this machine so long... I'll be able to tell... what the new grinder is "bringing to the table".
I think that will be even better intel going into the new machine... almost "part by part" ... like a 'scientific method'

luvmy40

#16: Post by luvmy40 »

Quester wrote:It might be helpful to explain. Are you thinking about the group head gasket issue and that sort of thing?

I have a modded 900 series BDB. It was a silly easy mod. It's certainly harder to control than the DE1 and shots are not as consistent, but it sometimes produces shots that rival the best ones I've pulled on the DE1.
I am thinking of the future service needs. Breville will no longer take the 900 machines on their flat rate service plan. They do offer a discount on a new 920 to 900 owners who need service.

The 900 is no less capable than the 920. If one does the required preventative maintenance regularly and uses non scaling water, the 900 should last many, many years.

luvmy40

#17: Post by luvmy40 »

beanEFIL wrote:...

I do think it's important to mention ... I HAVE NO USE FOR STEAM (I have a Breville if I need foam... a spoonful on top and voila... or n/a) I only need to make espresso.. plain and simple... "no workhorse req'd"... I make 2 shots per day... that's it.
From what I'm reading... it sounds like a single broiler is better then?? Is the dual only better for "making more shots" or actual quality PER shot??

Thanks-in-advance... again....
The Breville dual Boiler does allow you steam and pull shots simultaneously. I have never done that. Not once. The real advantage from the BDB is unprecedented temperature stability and control along with the ability to control your pre infusion and easy mods for excellent flow control. All for about the same price as prosumer HX or single boiler machine.

I have always maintained that the only valid argument against a BDB is one of aesthetics. It has no peers in the same price range.

Quester

#18: Post by Quester »

luvmy40 wrote:I am thinking of the future service needs. Breville will no longer take the 900 machines on their flat rate service plan. They do offer a discount on a new 920 to 900 owners who need service.

The 900 is no less capable than the 920. If one does the required preventative maintenance regularly and uses non scaling water, the 900 should last many, many years.
Got it--good information.

beanEFIL (original poster)

#19: Post by beanEFIL (original poster) »

BDB.... or the BDB... or was it the BDB......... Ok y'all I hear ya! hahahahahaha

I must admit... I wasn't expecting to literally hear the SAME advice... and the SAME machine.....
There are soooo many machines! hahahaha
That said... if the Breville Dual Boiler... has so many of you... recommending it...
I'll get it!
It's only $1600... which seems inexpensive when the other one in the running is one of the Decents...

BDB 920... Niche Zero...
These are my finalists....

Last chance for anyone to say STOP DON'T DO IT WOMAN! hahahaha

Only thing I can think of... that maybe you all don't factor in... is the "rookie" card...
While most of you have had a lot of experience... I have not...
That said...IS THERE ANYTHING ABOUT EITHER (BDB, Niche zero) A BEGINNER would consider a "con"??
Would you consider this machine "easy to use/maintain/clean"?? (I know that's relative but)
Just try and remember when you had your first machine... was there anything you struggled with... you think I might... with these machines in particular??

Wow. It just hit me. I'm finally doing this.

To everyone that replied to my post... it only being my 2nd... THANK YOU SOOOO MUCH!!!!
I can't wait to report back (and blame all of YOU if ANYthing goes wrong.... hahahahaha Kidding!!!;).

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Jeff
Team HB

#20: Post by Jeff »

beanEFIL wrote: That said...IS THERE ANYTHING ABOUT EITHER (BDB, Niche zero) A BEGINNER would consider a "con"??
No matter the gear:

* Espresso at home isn't like the commercials, no instantly gratifying, push-button nirvana on a sunny Sunday morning
* Espresso gear requires attention to water, far beyond just buying any-old bottled water or some fancy-name filter
* Espresso gear requires attention to maintenance
* Coffee is an often-overlooked component of success