Are two grinders necessary?

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
QuareCrack

#1: Post by QuareCrack »

I have been driving myself crazy trying to find a grinder (or perhaps more importantly burrs) that work well for espresso and brew (Chemex).

I find myself drawn to grinders than suffer from unobtainium (Monolith Max, EG-1, P64) in the pursuit of finding the 'one for all' brew methods. Yet, I don't think it is possible to get the best brew and best espresso with the same burrs.

Now, I am moving closer to buying one P64 with Unimodal burrs for brew and a second one with HU SSP burrs for espresso. This seems ridiculous and I don't really want two grinders on my counter.

Full disclosure, I don't have an espresso machine yet but plan on buying a Linea Mini in the next year. I brew Chemex everyday, using anywhere from 36 to 100g beans per day. I currently use a Lido 3 and I feel like I could be missing out on better coffee. It produces too many fines (some beans worse than others) in my opinion and this has a tendency to cause the Chemex to stall. I used to have a Gaggia Classic and used the Lido 3 for espresso grinding, I'll never hand grind for espresso again. It is too much work.

Ideally I want one grinder that will perform well for both brew methods without changing burrs.

In the experience of others, what grinders and burrs combinations come closest to being a 'one for all' methods grinder?

Eiern

#2: Post by Eiern »

Lagom P100 with High Uniformity should work pretty well for both actually, and has little retention so not too bad switching between brewing methods. Buy a proportionally less expensive machine than the Linea Mini and more on the grinder. I managed well with only one EK43 grinder with stock burrs for a few years. But have to purge a little in between brewing methods.

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Jonk

#3: Post by Jonk »

Depending on what kind of preferences you have, you could also be satisfied with that P64 with unimodal burrs for both espresso and brew. I have those SSP burrs in a Mazzer, so no RPM profiling.. but if anything I like them even more for (light roast) espresso. The pour overs are sometimes too clean for me, but if Chemex is your thing then perhaps that would not be an issue for you.

Jeff
Team HB

#4: Post by Jeff »

I can only relay impressions from a limited set of others in the EU, as the Bentwood Vertical is still on its way to US (120 V) markets. It's said to be a great grinder for both brew and espresso by many of those that have one. There probably won't be a lot more information from North American owners for a couple months, but it has caught my eye and probably my credit card.

Bentwood Vertical 63

Apparently more information on German-language forums as well.

emradguy
Supporter ❤

#5: Post by emradguy »

Why is it not ridiculous to have an espresso machine and a pourover device, but ridiculous to have a grinder for espresso and a grinder for pourover?

tennisman03110

#6: Post by tennisman03110 »

Who is saying two grinders is ridiculous?

However, If there was an argument, at the end of the day, any and all coffee grinders make the same product, ground coffee beans.

An espresso machine and a pourover cone each make something different, using ground coffee. You can't make espresso with a V60. You can make V60 with grounds from an espresso focused grinder.

QuareCrack (original poster)

#7: Post by QuareCrack (original poster) »

Thanks for your replies everyone, much appreciated. You have given me a few things to think about.

I must admit, I had discounted the P100 as I thought high uniformity burrs were geared towards espresso. On closer inspection, Option-O specifically mention the 98mm burrs behave completely differently to their 64mm burrs and are more multipurpose. It could be a good option as Option-O do tend to have better availability compared to the likes of Monolith Max. Looks are subjective of course but the P100 is hardly a looker but the black version they have coming is an improvement in my opinion.

I don't think anyone said two grinders was ridiculous - apart from me in my first post. I would like to avoid it is all. I fully appreciate there is a 'right tool for the job' in virtually every aspect of life.

I agree that if it can do espresso, then it is capable for filter also. My experience is perhaps influenced by my current conical burr grinder that I find produces a brew which is a bit one dimensional with little clarity of flavour notes. I would hope my next grinder with flat burrs would improve the overall experience and if I can, I would like it to work for espresso and filter.

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QuareCrack (original poster)

#8: Post by QuareCrack (original poster) »

Jeff wrote:I can only relay impressions from a limited set of others in the EU, as the Bentwood Vertical is still on its way to US (120 V) markets. It's said to be a great grinder for both brew and espresso by many of those that have one. There probably won't be a lot more information from North American owners for a couple months, but it has caught my eye and probably my credit card.

Bentwood Vertical 63

Apparently more information on German-language forums as well.

The Brentwood is a stunning looking grinder but much too large for my home setup. I am UK based and there is limited information on it here as well but it looks great.

BodieZoffa

#9: Post by BodieZoffa »

Might be necessary for those that are OCD with coffee. Kind of like those that splurge on multiple vehicles so each can be driven to accommodate certain types of weather. Might be helpful, but not practical for most people. I say for grinders just buy one specifically for the most used brew method and deal with the less-than-perfect results if you switch to something else. IMBHO once dialed in with espresso there's simply no other brew method that can come close for me.

Eiern

#10: Post by Eiern »

I also think P64 with Multi Purpose can do both, just not as well as the P100 with its auto purge and flicking chute (the P64 packs some grinds in the chute) but I wouldn't recommend Multi Purpose for a stock Linea Mini, especially if one doesn't want to embrace a less traditional espresso brewing style. And in my experience 98mm HU is a little more traditional espresso tasting/style than 64mm Multi Purpose, even if they share some qualities.