Are two grinders necessary? - Page 2

Recommendations for buyers and upgraders from the site's members.
Nate42

#11: Post by Nate42 »

Having 2 grinders is pretty handy if nothing else just to not have to drastically readjust when changing from espresso to brew. That said my second grinder is currently in my work office and I switch between espresso and brew as needed with my home grinder, a monolith flat, with the original burrs. Flat is a great espresso grinder and "good enough " pour over grinder. And yeah, a bit unobtainium, but not quite so bad as the max. In part because people are upgrading to the max and selling their flats. Keep an eye on buy/sell here and ask Denis to join Kafatek forum if you are interested.

emradguy
Supporter ❤

#12: Post by emradguy »

I'd say the number of grinders one decides to buy depends on their experiences and goals. Certainly you can use a single grinder for every brew method and every bean type and roast level, but if you want to get the most out of every option available, have developed your palate to appreciate the subtle (and not so subtle) differences, and have the funds to buy what you want, then you'll have more than one. Sone of us have more than 2. I have 2 for espresso...at home (Kafatek Monolith Flat for lighter roasts, and Kafatek MC4 for medium and comfort blends)...one for espresso car travel (Niche Zero)...and one for espresso air travel (Kinu m47). Well, those are the ones I regularly use for espresso. I have one electric grinder for home pour over (Fellow Ode), and one hand grinder for travel French Press (OE Lido). And I also have an OE Pharos collecting dust.

Flair Espresso: handcrafted espresso. cafe-quality shots, anytime, anywhere
Sponsored by Flair Espresso
Espressoman007

#13: Post by Espressoman007 »

Hi,
I have Lagom P64 and I bought it especially for espresso, because I don't drink pour over. It was rated as excellent for both espresso and pour over. But I don't share that opinion at all. Lagom P64 is just not in the same league as Monolith Flat when it comes to espresso taste. And that's what I've realised after I bought Monolith Flat.
There is another grinder that I've been checking out recently. I have Monolith Flat for lighter roasted coffee, but I would like to have something for darker, Italian blends as well. And I am very close to buying Ditting 807 Lab Sweet. I would use Ditting for espresso only, but from what I've read it delivers best from both worlds. I'd like to try MC4, but since I am in Europe, like you...it's less of a hassle to grab Ditting for the similar price.
It really depends on what your expectations and taste buds are. If you would rather buy (if you drink beer) Heineken over Kilkenny, just because it's cheaper and that's enough for you to say that it's amazing but more affordable...then this what I wrote won't be of much help to you. But if you always prefer Kilkenny over Heineken...then think multiple times before you choose a grinder, otherwise you'll end up like me, with not one grinder on the counter but four-five or who knows how many :)
Good luck!
Cheers!

Nunas
Supporter ♡

#14: Post by Nunas »

Are two grinders necessary?
My experience has been that it isn't "necessary", but is darned handy if you are in the habit of switching back and forth daily. If your main brew is espresso, then resetting most grinders to something else and back again is a PITA if you're fastidious about dialing in. If you aren't, then no big deal. I have a bunch of grinders, two electric and the others manual. That said, my current main electric grinder is a Failai ZF64W, which has easy to see stepped settings. It would work fine switching, even daily. However, I prefer to use it only for espresso and I use my 1Zpresso and my Havana hand grinders for other small-pot use. For a large pot, such as my Chemex. I reset the ZF64 or pull out my old electric, now backup, Sette, which is set to a coarse grind.

Yan

#15: Post by Yan »

It's just a hobby for me and I don't do espresso anymore...but 3 manual grinders feels enough for me Apex, C40 & M47... If I have to choose one maybe C40.
Just in case it's G(Grinder) - OCD, I need more money to go to the therapist.... :D

Jonk

#16: Post by Jonk »

Nunas wrote:my current main electric grinder is a Failai ZF64W, which has easy to see stepped settings. It would work fine switching, even daily.
Could you elaborate on how easy it would be to switch settings with this? I'm guessing espresso -> pour over will be several full rotations of the dial? How many? I have read that it is supposed to have low retention, but have you done any measurement? Is there a clump crusher that might retain grounds like on the DF64? And at coarse settings, would the grounds still fall out in a controlled manner?

Lots of questions, but there's still so little information about that grinder 8)

Nunas
Supporter ♡

#17: Post by Nunas »

Jonk wrote:Could you elaborate on how easy it would be to switch settings with this? I'm guessing espresso -> pour over will be several full rotations of the dial? How many? I have read that it is supposed to have low retention, but have you done any measurement? Is there a clump crusher that might retain grounds like on the DF64? And at coarse settings, would the grounds still fall out in a controlled manner?
Lots of questions, but there's still so little information about that grinder 8)
Sure, no problem. BTW, here is a thread on the ZF64 here ZF64 There's a fairly complete review here https://coffeegeek.co/en/bplus-bzf64-co ... nder-test/ Alas, the associated videos are in French.
The dial continuously adjusts. But, not being a worm screw, it won't stay in adjustment for very long. Thus, the second thing that looks like a dial, but which is actually a push button; it has click stops. You can see it here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6iJ_tJ-cwI
I've found it to have very low retention, even lower than my Sette. The click stops go right around the burrs holder, but are far enough apart that fussier folks would complain that any two adjacent settings are too coarse/too fine. For me, a 99% espresso drinker, it isn't an issue. Still, I'd rather have a worm screw than the steps. I couldn't say how many steps from pour-over to espresso, as I don't often do pour-over :)
There's no clump crusher, just three sweeper arms to move the grinds out to the chute. I originally reported it to have few clumps. But since then I changed coffee several and have clumps with some. That said, they have not caused any issues.
The grinds fall out very nicely regardless of how coarse or fine.
Mine is the W-version, with a weight scale. I think the standard version would be nearly identical, apart from the scale.

BPlus: turning your coffee spirit
Sponsored by BPlus
boren

#18: Post by boren »

Nunas wrote:I reset the ZF64 or pull out my old electric, now backup, Sette, which is set to a coarse grind.
The Sette is considered a bad grinder for coarse grinds, even by Baratza. Are you using the original AP/S1 burrs that come with the grinder, or the BG/S2 version that's supposed to be slightly less bad for coarse grinds?

Ejquin

#19: Post by Ejquin »

My 2 cents - what makes a really good espresso burr is different from what makes a really good filter burr. You can have a burr that's really good at espresso that's "eh" for filter, or a burr that's great for filter that's "eh" for espresso, or a burr that's just "fine" for both, but not great for both. And maybe that's OK for you, but you need to think about that going into it.

My experience was - I had a monolith flat with SSP red speed burrs. A grinder that is, by all accounts, great for espresso, but after a while I was frustrated with it for filter. I only do filter so I decided to change to a grinder with burrs that are great for filter, and not so good for espresso. Now I'm happy.
★ Helpful

Nunas
Supporter ♡

#20: Post by Nunas »

boren wrote:The Sette is considered a bad grinder for coarse grinds, even by Baratza. Are you using the original AP/S1 burrs that come with the grinder, or the BG/S2 version that's supposed to be slightly less bad for coarse grinds?
Agreed. I'm just using it as a matter of convenience. We so rarely drink pour over coffee that it isn't critical to me.