Chilling Espresso and pH

Beginner or pro barista, all are invited to share.
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malachi
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Postby malachi » Sep 26, 2005, 8:05 pm

Abe Carmeli wrote:It's good to see you back in the game Chris. We missed you. 8)


Aw shucks...

BTW, you all should check out the PH of hot versus chilled espresso.

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Abe Carmeli
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Postby Abe Carmeli » Sep 26, 2005, 8:07 pm

malachi wrote:Aw shucks...

BTW, you all should check out the PH of hot versus chilled espresso.


Please tell, oh great one. What's happening there?
Abe Carmeli

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malachi
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Postby malachi » Sep 26, 2005, 8:10 pm

Oh come on... you don't want me to ruin your fun, do you?
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Postby Abe Carmeli » Sep 26, 2005, 8:12 pm

malachi wrote:Oh come on... you don't want me to ruin your fun, do you?


I'm out of test strips but a wild guess says it gets acidic as it cools?
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Postby HB » Sep 26, 2005, 8:14 pm

Well, I'm going to guess that the loss of carbon dioxide would come into play. Now only if I could remember how that affects pH... I think it goes acidic. Unfortunately I don't own a pH meter. Is this effect something that can be easily tasted, and if so, what's the protocol for a malachi-approved chilled espresso?
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Postby default » Sep 27, 2005, 8:42 am

i've a pH meter, what can i do to test it?

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Postby Abe Carmeli » Sep 27, 2005, 8:55 am

default wrote:i've a pH meter, what can i do to test it?


Test the acidity of a shot after it is pulled (hot), then periodically as it cools off until it is at room temperature. Lastly, put it in the fridge for 30 minutes and test it again.
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Postby Dogshot » Sep 27, 2005, 9:04 am

I would think this phenomenon has more to do with time than temperature.

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malachi
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Postby malachi » Sep 27, 2005, 10:59 am

Both in my experience.
For example, pull a shot into liquid nitrogen and then evaluate - compare to a shot pulled into a demi and then cooled in a cocktail shaker with an ice cube.
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barry
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Postby barry » Sep 27, 2005, 4:46 pm

Abe Carmeli wrote:[quote="default"]i've a pH meter, what can i do to test it?


Test the acidity of a shot after it is pulled (hot), then periodically as it cools off until it is at room temperature. Lastly, put it in the fridge for 30 minutes and test it again.[/quote]


somewhere in the deep recesses of my mind, something is screaming, "NO! can't do that."

hhrrrmmm.... something having to do with the test solution being around room temp in order for the meter to work properly.