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Profiles needed for Hottop 8828P

Postby angman on Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:48 am

Hi coffee lovers. I recently acquired a used 8828P model and have been playing around with some roasts. so far I haven't had much success and my searches haven't come up with much. Can users/owners provide some profiles that have worked for both espresso and pour overs? I know there will be many variables that will still affect a roast but a good starting point would be great. I picked up the P model hoping that I can make some simple and quick roasts. If I have to i will get a B model panel but i'd rather not get so involved if I don't have too. I have two young ones to attend too and frequently get interrupted. Thank you in advance!
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Postby ronsil on Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:40 am

Hi
Why not try the built-in profile (0) initially & then change parts of it to suit your taste. I have loads of profiles which I used to use prior to computerization but they are all in degrees C. Also they do not easily adapt to the lower voltage you probably have.

Remember its essential to keep profile records of everything you try.

When you are able to obtain the roast you like you may wish to consider adding a TC probe through the chute lid as outlined by Randy Glass on the Hottop USA website.

Regret 'simple' & 'quick' are not usually in the home roasters vocab.

Good luck

Ron
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Postby Randy G. on Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:04 am

As much as I like the Hottop roaster (I wrote the manual and am the Hottop webmaster, creating all the Hottop USA website content and layout), I NEVER liked the "P" control panel. It may suit the needs of some users, but I found it counter-intuitive to the way my brain works and my style of usage. I did not like the loss of time in a segment if a segment is programmed less than its three minutes, and the binary control of the heating element the system uses. The nature of these forums tends to draw enthusiasts who want as much control as possible, but still, I cannot ever remember recommending the "P" model. With that said...

If you really want control over that machine, here's what I recommend:

HTC+TC4 combination boards - (http://www.mlgp-llc.com/htri/index.html).
Owners manual at: http://www.mlgp-llc.com/htri/pdf/HTRI-U...e-v100.pdf

RoastLogger (software) - http://homepage.ntlworld.com/green_bean...logger.htm
RoastLogger manual: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/green_bean...Manual.pdf

I have been using this system for the last 25 or so roasts I have done and cannot imagine going back to "B" panel control, as good as it was. I created both user manuals, but receive no benefit from their use. Particularly for "D" and "P" owners, I highly recommend this after-market add-on.
Espresso! My Espresso!
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
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Postby ronsil on Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:29 pm

angman wrote:If I have to i will get a B model panel


If you are even considering changing out your 'P' control panel for a 'B' panel. Don't go there when for the same amount $$ you can computerize the machine as Randy has stated in his post.

I can assure you its very simple to do. I did it & I know very little about electronics.

Once you have installed the 'mod' its really simple to program the roaster to perform exactly as you need. The basic built-in script gives an almost perfect result for most roasts without adjustment. When you have become familiar with what it does you can tweak it a little to suit a roast or your tastes.

Today I completed my 30th. roast with the system.

Ron
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Postby rama on Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:34 pm

If you're just getting started, don't worry about the profile so much. Use about 7-8oz of beans, aim to maintain a 20F/min rise until the start of first crack in about 8-9 minutes, then slow as quickly as you can (cut the power) to maintain a 5F/min rise for another 3-4 minutes.

If you can do that relatively consistently, you don't need anything else right now. If you want to *automate* it, that's another manner, but don't get ahead of yourself.
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