Hobbyist Roasters > Professional Roasters - Page 2

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
dale_cooper
Posts: 139
Joined: Feb 07, 2015, 5:47 pm

Postby dale_cooper » Jan 10, 2017, 11:04 am

Hi Steve - when are you hitting end of drying for that main roast that hit FC at 9:00?

Thanks for sharing your methodology of modulating flavors with this bean (bring's Rob Hoos' book to life :) )

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DreadfullVegan
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Joined: Jan 07, 2017, 1:41 am

Postby DreadfullVegan » Jan 11, 2017, 12:32 am

dale_cooper wrote:Hi Steve - when are you hitting end of drying for that main roast that hit FC at 9:00?

Thanks for sharing your methodology of modulating flavours with this bean (bring's Rob Hoos' book to life :) )

batch size 20lbs
charge at 380f
turning point 155f @1:21.
Out of drying 300f @5:12
FC 390f @9:42.
Development after FC 2:06 (I was wrong about 2:30 in previous statement)
Drop temp 407f.

Phases:
Drying 44.5%, maillard 37.7%, and development after FC 17.8%. In regards to the devel. after FC I would of dropped it @ 1:45 instead of the 2+.

Love Rob's book, and Scott's is great too. the thing to understand is, it's mainly discussing how to make great S.O. Their roasting style is leave tons of origin character, and that's great for coffees that have a Huge ''sweet spot''. Anyone can roast a super fresh crop (it's almost fail prof) but past crop and faded coffee is a fun challenge. You have to be able to taste the coffee and know in your mind what the notes will change into if you go darker or lighter.
Black Oak Coffee Roasters
476 N State St, Ukiah, CA 95482

dale_cooper
Posts: 139
Joined: Feb 07, 2015, 5:47 pm

Postby dale_cooper » Jan 11, 2017, 1:20 pm

To be honest, I don't really like either book... although I thought Rob's was more interesting with regard to providing more detail with regard to the roast phases. Both are nebulous in the sense of presenting concepts in a vacuum. Rob goes through each stage of the roast but all of the choices made are predicated upon how the roast was going in the other stages; or important detail is left out that makes it hard to actually take away something (and I'm not someone who wants all the answers, I love figuring things out). That's why roasting theory without having a roasting buddy/master/apprentice, is very difficult - it can be incredibly complex as everything is intermixed and its a long discussion to talk about how you think everything relates.

RAO's book gives very little detail and/or presents concepts as "golden rules" which can really disrupt you from experimenting with other methods. I've had more success breaking his rules actually.


Huge props to you for posting raw data (most of the time, curves and more details are hush hush) - I get more from seeing actual data and then theorizing in my head what the phases, times, etc actually mean and how a goal was met. At a local coffee event, a pro-roaster shared a cropster print which was amazing. I finally could see how hot they were going into FC and thought ohhhhh, I've been going in much slower than I thought. The roast length means nothing to me without understanding individual phases and particularly how heat is progressing in ramp and FC, but no one, aside from a select few, wants to ever share that. Shout out to cat and cloud podcast for providing awesome info with respect to more details.

Thanks again for sharing Steve, always something to take away and learn!