General Gesha Profile

Discuss roast levels and profiles for espresso, equipment for roasting coffee.
dustin360
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Postby dustin360 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 3:25 am

So im aware that there is never going to be a perfect profile... But that doesn't mean you don't have your "go to" profiles on certain beans when you first get them. For instance when I get a new Dry processed Ethiopian in I generally run a fast profile(8:30 to 10 mins) with a higher charge temp of 390 to 400, with a fast drying(3mins), med mid phase(4 to 5 mins), and quick finish (1:30 to 2:30). Finish temp between 402 and 414 (first crack at around 385 to 390). With low fan the whole time (fan setting to 5 on the Quest). Ill run a couple profiles like this and then cup them and adjust.

So my question what your general starting point with Geshas?

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another_jim
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Postby another_jim » Sat Dec 08, 2012 10:10 am

My suspicion after roasting a half dozen or so different Geishas is that they come in a wide range of densities, with the low density ones requiring gentler roasts. The Don Pachi, a DP froim a somewhat low lying farm needs to be treated with kid gloves; as did the Guatemalan one that SM sold last year. The various Esmeraldas, washed and very high grown, taste much more interesting when roasted with more heat and a wider ground to whole bean roast color difference.

So I'm thinking the general rules for roasting Centrals and Colombian coffees apply.

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Italyhound
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Postby Italyhound » Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:52 am

"gentler roasts"

I know it's a loaded question because even low altitude beans are processed differently so there is never one right answer.

Still, Jim, may I ask you to elaborate a little more on this term because I think it would be helpful to me and others who are trying to break free from a standard go to profile. Lower density to me is a clue to use less heat. Less heat across the board means a longer dry time and a longer ramp to first crack. This may not always be a good thing, I suppose.

When you say 'gentler', are you going easier on the power throughout the roast or being careful to pay attention to heat at some particular point/s? Do you do anything to compensate, like more fan or smaller batches perhaps in such cases?

Thanks in advance for the clarification. It would help me better understand the general concept of tailoring roasts to different beans- something I have thus far been sophomoric at.
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farmroast
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Postby farmroast » Sat Dec 08, 2012 1:26 pm

I've found density(altitude) can vary with different Gesha too. Less energy is needed for the softer to keep them moving along as well as controlling the outside to inside desired ratio and avoiding scorching.
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another_jim
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Postby another_jim » Sat Dec 08, 2012 2:19 pm

Italyhound wrote:"gentler roasts"


I meant at lowered drum and environmental temperatures. You can increase the ventilation, or reduce the load, to maintain the same timing.

A commercial air roaster will roast with air blowing in at around 450F to 475F. That's a gentle roast and does low grown coffees really well. An old style Burns drum will have its almost still air and drum at around 550F to 575F. This is a very hot roast that does well with high grown beans. Probat style roasters, including the Quest, are in between these extremes; and since you can vary both air and heat, you can get quite close to ether extreme.

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Boldjava
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Postby Boldjava » Sat Dec 08, 2012 3:11 pm

another_jim wrote:...The Don Pachi, a DP froim a somewhat low lying farm needs to be treated with kid gloves; as did the Guatemalan one that SM sold last year.


I found this year's Don Pachi DP disappointing; last year's Guat from SM delightful.

dustin360
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Postby dustin360 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 10:18 pm

Ok, so im glad a couple people brought up the Guat Gesha from this year. (its the reason for this thread). I thought I had this coffee figured out, long profile (14 mins), low charge temp (300), Long drying/long mid (5 to 6), 2:50 to 3:30 finish, as low of end temp as possible.

But now im having trouble with this stupid coffee again. The above profile isnt working anymore, its either tasting underdeveloped or woody... Crap does that mean the green sucks now?! The percentage weight loss is way higher now as well. It went from 14% to 15.5 to 16% with no profile change? It been stored in an airtight container under my bed since I got it...

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Postby the_trystero » Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:23 pm

The Acatenango? For me it was a top 3 coffee of what I've roasted this year, so much better than the Esmeralda Geisha blend.

I haven't roasted any in over 2 months.

My profile for one lb was:

Charge at 360
5 min 300
10 min 378 1st crack starts
11 min 386
12 min 390 dump
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dustin360
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Postby dustin360 » Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:43 pm

Ya, the Acatenango. And its funny cause the Esmeralada has been way easier to roast and tastier for me(and Ive roasted way more of the guat then the Esmeralada). Even my "bad" roasts of the Esmeralda are pretty tasty, im drinking one right now(i didnt sell it to Stanza, cause other roasts cupped better).

Any way... Greg, I feel like if i tried that profile on the quest it would be underdeveloped. I haven't gotten good results from quicker finishes. But Ill try it and report back, what are your fan settings?

The really puzzling thing for me is why the percentage weight loss would rise so drastically, almost a full 2 percent. Thats insane!!! Im really thinking this is a green issue...? Like somehow the moisture level in the bean was affected.

Anyone ever have a drastic jump in weight loss for no apparent reason?

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the_trystero
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Postby the_trystero » Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:32 pm

dustin360 wrote:Ya, the Acatenango. And its funny cause the Esmeralada has been way easier to roast and tastier for me(and Ive roasted way more of the guat then the Esmeralada). Even my "bad" roasts of the Esmeralda are pretty tasty, im drinking one right now(i didnt sell it to Stanza, cause other roasts cupped better).

Any way... Greg, I feel like if i tried that profile on the quest it would be underdeveloped. I haven't gotten good results from quicker finishes. But Ill try it and report back, what are your fan settings?


People have been raving about my Esmeralda roasts, but those folks didn't have my Acatenango. hahaha

Anyway, I think the airflow is the opposite between and Quest and a Diedrich, right? With the Diedrich the fan pulls cool air through the drum so you open to cool, and you close to build heat. So, I start with the airflow off, at around 7 minutes turn airflow all the way to start slowing the roast down and to get rid of some early chaff and some of the moisture in the drum, at 8:30 I lower the burner setting and shut the airflow, then around 9:30 full airflow to remove chaff and really slow the roast.

Don't go by my temps because it appears to me that the Quest temps are about 10 degree higher than mine but I don't have one to compare apples to apples.
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