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New La Marzocco Linea wiring diagram?

Postby duke-one on Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:31 pm

Hello: Anyone have a copy of the latest wiring diagram for factory PID'ed Lineas? The best I can get from L.M. is a 2004 non-PID diagram.
Thanks, KDM
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Postby Billc on Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:06 pm

They do not yet have these available for the public. Only authorized distributors have these right now. They usually take a couple of years before they release them to the public. If you own one of these machines you can get one from the distributor you purchased it from. Otherwise you will probably have to wait. Was there something specific you wanted to know?


BillC
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Postby duke-one on Wed Sep 28, 2011 11:27 am

Bill; I'm expecting!! New machine due mid-October. Doing prep work now, filter, pressure regulator, upgraded drain line (added stand pipe-1¼" copper). I will put my single group Astoria auto compact on EBay unless some family member wants it.
Duke
PS: Does the diagram come with the manuals etc.?
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Postby Billc on Wed Sep 28, 2011 3:06 pm

Duke,
The electrical schematic does not usually come with the machine. Normally this is only available to authorized service companies.

Bill
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Postby duke-one on Wed Sep 28, 2011 4:43 pm

Bill:
I've been working with Visions and Mike Lanz at L.M., Mike got me the old diagram and I'm waiting on possibly getting the new one. These are not real (or proper) electrical diagrams, they are sechematics. In my industrial electrician world only "ladder diagrams" are considered proper and are much easier to work with especially when things get complex, like 50 pages long but even for small machines they are much better.
Duke
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Postby Billc on Sat Oct 01, 2011 2:23 am

Duke,
There is no standard for creating electrical disgrams.schematics. Every industry is different. That is why you see such wide variance in the descriptions/symbols. The main thing is that it shows how things are connected. I think it does this yes?

Bill
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Postby duke-one on Sat Oct 01, 2011 2:42 pm

Bill: There are standards for electrical prints, I only see "schematics" in appliances and other small devices. They are never used in any large scale electrical blueprints. In fact they could not be used beyond a few components or it would be unreadable. A ladder diagram is easy to read and has all the information to follow the S.O.O. (sequence of operations) without which it would quickly become a giant headache. It also can go on for page after page which is not necessary for small equipment but still would make a heck of a difference in understanding a circuit. When I used to do HVAC schematics were all we had and it was hell whenever it got beyond a few components and interconnects. When I got into my electricians apprenticeship and saw my first ladder diagrams, single line, three line, etc it was a giant breath of fresh air. They are the standard for all electric blueprints and should be adopted by all.
Duke
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