Grind setting for Moka pot

Coffee preparation techniques besides espresso like pourover.
Showtime84
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Postby Showtime84 » May 31, 2014, 2:57 am

This question is really aimed at Breville Smart Grinder owners since that's my current grinder. I plan to get into espresso one day, and I WILL get into espresso one day when I'm able to afford the grinder and a quality espresso machine. :mrgreen: So for now, I'm playing with standard brew methods. If anyone here owns a Smart Grinder, What exact grind setting do you use for a Moka pot?

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Eastsideloco
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Postby Eastsideloco » May 31, 2014, 11:01 am

There are different approaches to grinding for Moka pot.

The traditional approach is to use a relatively fine grind, slightly larger than espresso. However, this approach tends to result in a bitter cup, as a finely-ground coffee is more likely to overextract.

This Stumptown recipe is representative of Moka pot approaches that use a standard drip grind size and some intentional temperature control strategies to mitigate overextraction:

http://stumptowncoffee.com/brew-guides/moka-pot/

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Showtime84
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Postby Showtime84 » May 31, 2014, 1:22 pm

Thanks, would you say that the standard recommended grind size for Moka would be pretty close to the standard aeropress grind? I use the regular paper filter in my aeropress, and I've got the grind size dialed in pretty good. Its about the size of salt or sugar granules(maybe a bit smaller), and slightly finer than regular drip grind.

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Eastsideloco
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Postby Eastsideloco » May 31, 2014, 3:13 pm

I'm not sure there really is a "standard" grind size for AeroPress. I never paid too much attention to the "official" recipe, in large part because it calls for unusually low water temperatures. It seems to me that AP recipes—even championship recipes—are more varied than any other brewing method. Some people go coarse; some go fine. As long as the barista makes appropriate adjustments (dose, temperature, time, agitation, etc.), it seems like you can get good results in the cup with most any grind size.

What you are describing actually sounds to pretty close to a standard drip grind:

https://counterculturecoffee.com/learn/...-over-drip

Grind coarsely to roughly the size of granulated table salt.


It's certainly a reasonable place to start. If the brew is bitter (overextracted), go coarser. If it seems sour (underextracted), go finer.

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beer&mathematics
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Postby beer&mathematics » May 31, 2014, 3:21 pm

Showtime84 wrote:Thanks, would you say that the standard recommended grind size for Moka would be pretty close to the standard aeropress grind? I use the regular paper filter in my aeropress, and I've got the grind size dialed in pretty good. Its about the size of salt or sugar granules(maybe a bit smaller), and slightly finer than regular drip grind.


That sounds good place to start
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Showtime84
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Postby Showtime84 » May 31, 2014, 10:57 pm

Thanks guys, well I tried out my 6-cup moka for the first time today and had a subpar experience. When the coffee(fresh bella-donovan) started bubbling out, it suddenly started spraying everywhere and all over the stove. I had the heat set between medium and high. I guess I'll try it on medium next time, and maybe I will preheat the water as is suggested on most coffee sites. Any other suggestions :?:

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Eastsideloco
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Postby Eastsideloco » May 31, 2014, 11:47 pm

Temperature control is a challenge with a Moka pot. In this case, it sounds like you are applying too much heat too fast. If you start off with pre-heated water, then you don't have to do as much heating before the water kicks up. Mentally, that should make it easier to monitor what is going on with the brewer, because it will take less time to complete the brew cycle. Otherwise, it's tempting to stick the brewer on the stove and walk away, which can get messy.

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goramsey
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Postby goramsey » Nov 25, 2014, 11:20 am

I have a Bialetti Venus Moka Pot 6 cup. It puts out a pretty good cup o' joe. I am finding that one or two clicks above my Aeropress setting on my Capresso burr grinder gives me a great tasting cup. Medium low flame. That gets me somewhere around 4 to 5 minutes before the dark liquid starts oozing out of the unit. I pull it off just a few seconds into the more gurgeling light color stream starts and submerge in cold water to stop extraction fast. Pour and enjoy. Whoa, I'll take another cup please.
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lkellyhappy1
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Postby lkellyhappy1 » Nov 28, 2014, 3:48 pm

I have been using a mokka pot for 20 years. i dont preheat the water or submerge in cold water after. I use the amount of coffee that I like to "my" taste. I heat on low on the stove and when i hear bubbling I shut it off pour and drink. Its not really that complicated. once you use it for a while you will develop your style for using it.